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Interaction between neighboring vegetation patches: impact on flow and deposition

Dieter Meire UGent, John Kondziolka and Heidi Nepf (2014) WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH. 50(5). p.3809-3825
abstract
Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands and channels, patches of vegetation are rarely isolated and neighboring patches influence one another during their development. In this experimental study, an adjacent pair of emergent vegetation patches were modeled by circular arrays of cylinders with their centers aligned in a direction that was perpendicular to the flow direction. The flow and deposition patterns behind the pair of patches were measured for two stem densities and for different patch separations (gap widths). The wake pattern immediately behind each individual patch was similar to that observed behind an isolated patch, with a velocity minimum directly behind each patch that produced a well-defined region of enhanced deposition in line with the patch. For all gap widths (Δ), the velocity on the centerline between the patches (Uc) was elevated to a peak velocity Umax that persisted over a distance Lj. Although Umax was not a function of Δ, Lj decreased with decreasing Δ. Beyond Lj, the wakes merged and Uc decayed to a local minimum. The merging of wakes and associated velocity minimum produced a local maximum in deposition downstream from and on the centerline between the patches. If this secondary region of enhanced deposition promotes new vegetation growth, the increased drag on the centerline could slow velocity between the upstream patch pair, leading to conditions favorable to their merger.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SEDIMENT, DYNAMICS, AQUATIC VEGETATION, STREAMS, RIVER CORRIDORS, HYDRAULIC RESISTANCE, SCALE-DEPENDENT FEEDBACK, SUBMERGED FLEXIBLE VEGETATION, TURBULENCE, MACROPHYTES
journal title
WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH
Water Resour. Res.
volume
50
issue
5
pages
3809 - 3825
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000337672900012
JCR category
WATER RESOURCES
JCR impact factor
3.549 (2014)
JCR rank
3/83 (2014)
JCR quartile
1 (2014)
ISSN
0043-1397
DOI
10.1002/2013WR015070
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5733713
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5733713
date created
2014-10-22 14:30:40
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:47:33
@article{5733713,
  abstract     = {Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands and channels, patches of vegetation are rarely isolated and neighboring patches influence one another during their development. In this experimental study, an adjacent pair of emergent vegetation patches were modeled by circular arrays of cylinders with their centers aligned in a direction that was perpendicular to the flow direction. The flow and deposition patterns behind the pair of patches were measured for two stem densities and for different patch separations (gap widths). The wake pattern immediately behind each individual patch was similar to that observed behind an isolated patch, with a velocity minimum directly behind each patch that produced a well-defined region of enhanced deposition in line with the patch. For all gap widths (\ensuremath{\Delta}), the velocity on the centerline between the patches (Uc) was elevated to a peak velocity Umax that persisted over a distance Lj. Although Umax was not a function of \ensuremath{\Delta}, Lj decreased with decreasing \ensuremath{\Delta}. Beyond Lj, the wakes merged and Uc decayed to a local minimum. The merging of wakes and associated velocity minimum produced a local maximum in deposition downstream from and on the centerline between the patches. If this secondary region of enhanced deposition promotes new vegetation growth, the increased drag on the centerline could slow velocity between the upstream patch pair, leading to conditions favorable to their merger.},
  author       = {Meire, Dieter and Kondziolka, John and Nepf, Heidi},
  issn         = {0043-1397},
  journal      = {WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {SEDIMENT,DYNAMICS,AQUATIC VEGETATION,STREAMS,RIVER CORRIDORS,HYDRAULIC RESISTANCE,SCALE-DEPENDENT FEEDBACK,SUBMERGED FLEXIBLE VEGETATION,TURBULENCE,MACROPHYTES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {3809--3825},
  title        = {Interaction between neighboring vegetation patches: impact on flow and deposition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2013WR015070},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Meire, Dieter, John Kondziolka, and Heidi Nepf. 2014. “Interaction Between Neighboring Vegetation Patches: Impact on Flow and Deposition.” Water Resources Research 50 (5): 3809–3825.
APA
Meire, Dieter, Kondziolka, J., & Nepf, H. (2014). Interaction between neighboring vegetation patches: impact on flow and deposition. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, 50(5), 3809–3825.
Vancouver
1.
Meire D, Kondziolka J, Nepf H. Interaction between neighboring vegetation patches: impact on flow and deposition. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH. 2014;50(5):3809–25.
MLA
Meire, Dieter, John Kondziolka, and Heidi Nepf. “Interaction Between Neighboring Vegetation Patches: Impact on Flow and Deposition.” WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH 50.5 (2014): 3809–3825. Print.