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Construction grammar and Greek

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Abstract
Construction Grammar has its origin in the early work of Charles Fillmore and his Berkeley associates. It has, by now, become a viable alternative to other contemporary linguistic frameworks and is widely practiced in Europe and Asia, in addition to the United States. The fundamental assumption within Construction Grammar is that the basic unit of language is the construction, a form–meaning pairing. The framework was originally designed to account for the idiomatic, idiosyncratic and irregular in language, although the theoretical machinery used to account for this may also be used to capture regular and compositional aspects of language. Construction Grammar analyses of Ancient Greek are almost non-existent, with the exception of Cristofaro (2008). With the aid of two data sets from Ancient Greek, we lay out the ingredients of a constructional analysis for that language.
Keywords
Construction Grammar, Ancient Greek, Dative of Agent, Infinitive with Accusative Subject, Form–Meaning Correspondences, Idiosyncrasy

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Citation

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MLA
Barddal, Johanna, and Serena Danesi. “Construction Grammar and Greek.” Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics. Ed. Georgios K Giannakis. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill, 2014. 375–379. Print.
APA
Barddal, J., & Danesi, S. (2014). Construction grammar and Greek. In G. K. Giannakis (Ed.), Encyclopedia of ancient Greek language and linguistics (pp. 375–379). Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.
Chicago author-date
Barddal, Johanna, and Serena Danesi. 2014. “Construction Grammar and Greek.” In Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics, ed. Georgios K Giannakis, 375–379. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Barddal, Johanna, and Serena Danesi. 2014. “Construction Grammar and Greek.” In Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Language and Linguistics, ed. Georgios K Giannakis, 375–379. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.
Vancouver
1.
Barddal J, Danesi S. Construction grammar and Greek. In: Giannakis GK, editor. Encyclopedia of ancient Greek language and linguistics. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill; 2014. p. 375–9.
IEEE
[1]
J. Barddal and S. Danesi, “Construction grammar and Greek,” in Encyclopedia of ancient Greek language and linguistics, G. K. Giannakis, Ed. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill, 2014, pp. 375–379.
@incollection{5730711,
  abstract     = {Construction Grammar has its origin in the early work of Charles Fillmore and his Berkeley associates. It has, by now, become a viable alternative to other contemporary linguistic frameworks and is widely practiced in Europe and Asia, in addition to the United States. The fundamental assumption within Construction Grammar is that the basic unit of language is the construction, a form–meaning pairing. The framework was originally designed to account for the idiomatic, idiosyncratic and irregular in language, although the theoretical machinery used to account for this may also be used to capture regular and compositional aspects of language. Construction Grammar analyses of Ancient Greek are almost non-existent, with the exception of Cristofaro (2008). With the aid of two data sets from Ancient Greek, we lay out the ingredients of a constructional analysis for that language.},
  author       = {Barddal, Johanna and Danesi, Serena},
  booktitle    = {Encyclopedia of ancient Greek language and linguistics},
  editor       = {Giannakis, Georgios K},
  isbn         = {9789004225978},
  keywords     = {Construction Grammar,Ancient Greek,Dative of Agent,Infinitive with Accusative Subject,Form–Meaning Correspondences,Idiosyncrasy},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {375--379},
  publisher    = {Brill},
  title        = {Construction grammar and Greek},
  year         = {2014},
}