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Toward practical implementation of conservation agriculture : a case study in the May Zeg-zeg catchment (Ethiopia)

Sil Lanckriet UGent, Tesfay Araya Weldeslassie UGent, Ben Derudder UGent, Wim Cornelis UGent, Hans Bauer, Bram Govaerts, Jozef Deckers, Mitiku Haile, Jozef Naudts and Jan Nyssen UGent (2014) AGROECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS. 38(8). p.913-935
abstract
Conservation agriculture (CA) is often quoted as a beneficial resource-saving technique for dryland agriculture, but its large-scale implementation is frequently hindered by the lack of farmers' acceptance. To date, few studies have investigated the impact of spatial factors, costs and benefits and regional agroecosystem differentiation on adoption of CA. This study, therefore, aims to assess the impact of these factors through a case study in the North Ethiopian Highlands. One hundred eight farmers of 11 villages surrounding an experimental plot were interviewed in order to identify their knowledge and acceptance of the technique. The results show that several spatial factors play a role in CA acceptance. The lack of knowledge on the resource-saving technique proved primarily dependent (R = -0.73) on spatial impedance with the innovation source and on the strength of sociospatial networks. Next, a consumer model showed that perceived costs and benefits seem to balance each other. Finally, some agronomic traditions were identified that are related to the regional agroecosystem, which are not favoring the implementation of zero-tillage practices. Since this study identified acceptance problems related to several spatial and regional factors, future CA adoption schemes must allow better regional differentiation optimized to local contexts and conditions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
developing- countries, soil-erosion, reduced tillage, random utility model, diffusion of innovation, highlands, innovation, fertility, adoption, zero-tillage, diffusion, systems, management
journal title
AGROECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS
Agroecol. Sustain. Food Syst.
volume
38
issue
8
pages
913 - 935
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000341146100004
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
0.719 (2014)
JCR rank
24/56 (2014)
JCR quartile
2 (2014)
ISSN
2168-3565
DOI
10.1080/21683565.2014.917143
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
5718183
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5718183
date created
2014-10-06 14:36:06
date last changed
2017-10-05 06:50:22
@article{5718183,
  abstract     = {Conservation agriculture (CA) is often quoted as a beneficial resource-saving technique for dryland agriculture, but its large-scale implementation is frequently hindered by the lack of farmers' acceptance. To date, few studies have investigated the impact of spatial factors, costs and benefits and regional agroecosystem differentiation on adoption of CA. This study, therefore, aims to assess the impact of these factors through a case study in the North Ethiopian Highlands. One hundred eight farmers of 11 villages surrounding an experimental plot were interviewed in order to identify their knowledge and acceptance of the technique. The results show that several spatial factors play a role in CA acceptance. The lack of knowledge on the resource-saving technique proved primarily dependent (R = -0.73) on spatial impedance with the innovation source and on the strength of sociospatial networks. Next, a consumer model showed that perceived costs and benefits seem to balance each other. Finally, some agronomic traditions were identified that are related to the regional agroecosystem, which are not favoring the implementation of zero-tillage practices. Since this study identified acceptance problems related to several spatial and regional factors, future CA adoption schemes must allow better regional differentiation optimized to local contexts and conditions.},
  author       = {Lanckriet, Sil and Araya Weldeslassie, Tesfay and Derudder, Ben and Cornelis, Wim and Bauer, Hans and Govaerts, Bram and Deckers, Jozef and Haile, Mitiku and Naudts, Jozef and Nyssen, Jan},
  issn         = {2168-3565},
  journal      = {AGROECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS},
  keyword      = {developing- countries,soil-erosion,reduced tillage,random utility model,diffusion of innovation,highlands,innovation,fertility,adoption,zero-tillage,diffusion,systems,management},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {913--935},
  title        = {Toward practical implementation of conservation agriculture : a case study in the May Zeg-zeg catchment (Ethiopia)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21683565.2014.917143},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Lanckriet, Sil, Tesfay Araya Weldeslassie, Ben Derudder, Wim Cornelis, Hans Bauer, Bram Govaerts, Jozef Deckers, Mitiku Haile, Jozef Naudts, and Jan Nyssen. 2014. “Toward Practical Implementation of Conservation Agriculture : a Case Study in the May Zeg-zeg Catchment (Ethiopia).” Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems 38 (8): 913–935.
APA
Lanckriet, S., Araya Weldeslassie, T., Derudder, B., Cornelis, W., Bauer, H., Govaerts, B., Deckers, J., et al. (2014). Toward practical implementation of conservation agriculture : a case study in the May Zeg-zeg catchment (Ethiopia). AGROECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS, 38(8), 913–935.
Vancouver
1.
Lanckriet S, Araya Weldeslassie T, Derudder B, Cornelis W, Bauer H, Govaerts B, et al. Toward practical implementation of conservation agriculture : a case study in the May Zeg-zeg catchment (Ethiopia). AGROECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS. 2014;38(8):913–35.
MLA
Lanckriet, Sil, Tesfay Araya Weldeslassie, Ben Derudder, et al. “Toward Practical Implementation of Conservation Agriculture : a Case Study in the May Zeg-zeg Catchment (Ethiopia).” AGROECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS 38.8 (2014): 913–935. Print.