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When consistency matters: the effect of valence consistency on review helpfulness

Simon Quaschning (UGent) , Mario Pandelaere (UGent) and Iris Vermeir (UGent)
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Abstract
When evaluating the helpfulness of online reviews, review valence is a particularly relevant factor. This research argues that the influence of review valence is highly dependent on its consistency with the valence of other available reviews. Using both field and experimental data, this paper show that consistent reviews are perceived as more helpful than inconsistent reviews, independent of them being positive or negative. Experiments show that this valence consistency effect is driven by causal attributions, such that consistent reviews are more likely to be attributed to the actual product experience, while inconsistent reviews are more likely to be attributed to some reviewer idiosyncrasy. Supporting the attribution theory framework, reviewer expertise moderates the effect of consumers' causal attributions on review helpfulness.
Keywords
Consistency, Causal Attributions, ONLINE CONSUMER REVIEWS, WORD-OF-MOUTH, NEGATIVITY BIAS, PERCEIVED USEFULNESS, CREDIBILITY, IMPACT, PERSPECTIVE, ATTRIBUTION, Review Helpfulness, INFORMATION, BEHAVIOR, Review Valence, Costumer Reviews, Reviewer Expertise

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MLA
Quaschning, Simon, et al. “When Consistency Matters: The Effect of Valence Consistency on Review Helpfulness.” JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION, vol. 20, no. 2, Oxford University Press (OUP), 2015, pp. 136–52, doi:10.1111/jcc4.12106.
APA
Quaschning, S., Pandelaere, M., & Vermeir, I. (2015). When consistency matters: the effect of valence consistency on review helpfulness. JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION, 20(2), 136–152. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12106
Chicago author-date
Quaschning, Simon, Mario Pandelaere, and Iris Vermeir. 2015. “When Consistency Matters: The Effect of Valence Consistency on Review Helpfulness.” JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION 20 (2): 136–52. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12106.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Quaschning, Simon, Mario Pandelaere, and Iris Vermeir. 2015. “When Consistency Matters: The Effect of Valence Consistency on Review Helpfulness.” JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION 20 (2): 136–152. doi:10.1111/jcc4.12106.
Vancouver
1.
Quaschning S, Pandelaere M, Vermeir I. When consistency matters: the effect of valence consistency on review helpfulness. JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION. 2015;20(2):136–52.
IEEE
[1]
S. Quaschning, M. Pandelaere, and I. Vermeir, “When consistency matters: the effect of valence consistency on review helpfulness,” JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 136–152, 2015.
@article{5713241,
  abstract     = {{When evaluating the helpfulness of online reviews, review valence is a particularly relevant factor. This research argues that the influence of review valence is highly dependent on its consistency with the valence of other available reviews. Using both field and experimental data, this paper show that consistent reviews are perceived as more helpful than inconsistent reviews, independent of them being positive or negative. Experiments show that this valence consistency effect is driven by causal attributions, such that consistent reviews are more likely to be attributed to the actual product experience, while inconsistent reviews are more likely to be attributed to some reviewer idiosyncrasy. Supporting the attribution theory framework, reviewer expertise moderates the effect of consumers' causal attributions on review helpfulness.}},
  author       = {{Quaschning, Simon and Pandelaere, Mario and Vermeir, Iris}},
  issn         = {{1083-6101}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION}},
  keywords     = {{Consistency,Causal Attributions,ONLINE CONSUMER REVIEWS,WORD-OF-MOUTH,NEGATIVITY BIAS,PERCEIVED USEFULNESS,CREDIBILITY,IMPACT,PERSPECTIVE,ATTRIBUTION,Review Helpfulness,INFORMATION,BEHAVIOR,Review Valence,Costumer Reviews,Reviewer Expertise}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{136--152}},
  publisher    = {{Oxford University Press (OUP)}},
  title        = {{When consistency matters: the effect of valence consistency on review helpfulness}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcc4.12106}},
  volume       = {{20}},
  year         = {{2015}},
}

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