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Rationality: a social-epistemology perspective

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Abstract
Both in philosophy and in psychology, human rationality has traditionally been studied from an "individualistic" perspective. Recently, social epistemologists have drawn attention to the fact that epistemic interactions among agents also give rise to important questions concerning rationality. In previous work, we have used a formal model to assess the risk that a particular type of social-epistemic interactions lead agents with initially consistent belief states into inconsistent belief states. Here, we continue this work by investigating the dynamics to which these interactions may give rise in the population as a whole.
Keywords
social epistemology, MODEL, probability, rationality, theory, inconsistency, beliefs, opinion dynamics, computer simulations

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Wenmackers, S, Danny Vanpoucke, and I Douven. “Rationality: a Social-epistemology Perspective.” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY 5 (2014): n. pag. Print.
APA
Wenmackers, S., Vanpoucke, D., & Douven, I. (2014). Rationality: a social-epistemology perspective. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 5.
Chicago author-date
Wenmackers, S, Danny Vanpoucke, and I Douven. 2014. “Rationality: a Social-epistemology Perspective.” Frontiers in Psychology 5.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Wenmackers, S, Danny Vanpoucke, and I Douven. 2014. “Rationality: a Social-epistemology Perspective.” Frontiers in Psychology 5.
Vancouver
1.
Wenmackers S, Vanpoucke D, Douven I. Rationality: a social-epistemology perspective. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 2014;5.
IEEE
[1]
S. Wenmackers, D. Vanpoucke, and I. Douven, “Rationality: a social-epistemology perspective,” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 5, 2014.
@article{5713007,
  abstract     = {Both in philosophy and in psychology, human rationality has traditionally been studied from an "individualistic" perspective. Recently, social epistemologists have drawn attention to the fact that epistemic interactions among agents also give rise to important questions concerning rationality. In previous work, we have used a formal model to assess the risk that a particular type of social-epistemic interactions lead agents with initially consistent belief states into inconsistent belief states. Here, we continue this work by investigating the dynamics to which these interactions may give rise in the population as a whole.},
  articleno    = {581},
  author       = {Wenmackers, S and Vanpoucke, Danny and Douven, I},
  issn         = {1664-1078},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {social epistemology,MODEL,probability,rationality,theory,inconsistency,beliefs,opinion dynamics,computer simulations},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {14},
  title        = {Rationality: a social-epistemology perspective},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00581},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2014},
}

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