Advanced search
1 file | 6.06 MB

Edible oleogels based on water soluble food polymers: preparation, characterization and potential application

(2014) FOOD & FUNCTION. 5(11). p.2833-2841
Author
Organization
Project
SAT-FAT-FREE
Abstract
Oil structuring using food-approved polymers is an emerging strategy and holds significant promise in the area of food and nutrition. In the current study, edible oleogels (containing >97 wt% of sunflower oil) were prepared using a combination of water soluble food polymers (methylcellulose and xanthan gum) and further evaluated for potential application as a shortening alternative. Microstructure studies (including cryo-SEM) and rheology measurements were conducted to gain more insights into the properties of these new types of oleogels. In addition, the functionality of oleogel as a shortening alternative was studied in terms of batter properties and the texture analysis of cakes and compared to the reference batches made using either oil, commercial shortening or cake margarine. Interestingly, while the batter properties (air incorporation, rheology and microstructure) of the oleogel batch were more close to the oil batch, the textural properties of cakes were significantly better than oil and resembled more to the cakes prepared using shortening and margarine.
Keywords
food polymers, shortening alternatives, Oleogels, SHELLAC OLEOGELS, OXIDATION, OILS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 6.06 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Patel, Ashok, Nick Cludts, Mohd Dona Bin Sintang, Ans Lesaffer, and Koen Dewettinck. 2014. “Edible Oleogels Based on Water Soluble Food Polymers: Preparation, Characterization and Potential Application.” Food & Function 5 (11): 2833–2841.
APA
Patel, A., Cludts, N., Sintang, M. D. B., Lesaffer, A., & Dewettinck, K. (2014). Edible oleogels based on water soluble food polymers: preparation, characterization and potential application. FOOD & FUNCTION, 5(11), 2833–2841.
Vancouver
1.
Patel A, Cludts N, Sintang MDB, Lesaffer A, Dewettinck K. Edible oleogels based on water soluble food polymers: preparation, characterization and potential application. FOOD & FUNCTION. 2014;5(11):2833–41.
MLA
Patel, Ashok, Nick Cludts, Mohd Dona Bin Sintang, et al. “Edible Oleogels Based on Water Soluble Food Polymers: Preparation, Characterization and Potential Application.” FOOD & FUNCTION 5.11 (2014): 2833–2841. Print.
@article{5709043,
  abstract     = {Oil structuring using food-approved polymers is an emerging strategy and holds significant promise in the area of food and nutrition. In the current study, edible oleogels (containing {\textrangle}97 wt\% of sunflower oil) were prepared using a combination of water soluble food polymers (methylcellulose and xanthan gum) and further evaluated for potential application as a shortening alternative. Microstructure studies (including cryo-SEM) and rheology measurements were conducted to gain more insights into the properties of these new types of oleogels. In addition, the functionality of oleogel as a shortening alternative was studied in terms of batter properties and the texture analysis of cakes and compared to the reference batches made using either oil, commercial shortening or cake margarine. Interestingly, while the batter properties (air incorporation, rheology and microstructure) of the oleogel batch were more close to the oil batch, the textural properties of cakes were significantly better than oil and resembled more to the cakes prepared using shortening and margarine.},
  author       = {Patel, Ashok and Cludts, Nick and Sintang, Mohd Dona Bin and Lesaffer, Ans and Dewettinck, Koen},
  issn         = {2042-6496},
  journal      = {FOOD \& FUNCTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2833--2841},
  title        = {Edible oleogels based on water soluble food polymers: preparation, characterization and potential application},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C4FO00624K},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2014},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: