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Structural gender inequalities and the gender gap in highbrow cultural consumption: a cross-national comparative perspective

Susan Lagaert (UGent) and Henk Roose (UGent)
Author
Organization
Project
Gender inequality and cultural consumption: a macro-sociological, longitudinal and cross-national comparative perspective (FWO)
Abstract
One of the most consistent findings in the empirical study of cultural consumption is that women participate more often in highbrow cultural activities than men. In the 1980s, Randall Collins claimed that women’s higher rate of highbrow cultural consumption is related to the gendered division of labor: women are in charge of the status production and cultural reproduction within the household and men provide economic resources (i.e. class production) in the workplace. However, not only individual-level differences, but also macro-level gender inequalities in the organization of production (i.e. economic position of men and women) and reproduction (i.e. childbirth and parenting) constitute the opportunity structure for women’s cultural participation, because these structural inequalities reflect gender norms concerning women’s proper role in the family and the labor market. Yet, the impact of these macro-level inequalities on the gender gap in cultural consumption has received little empirical attention. Using multilevel analyses of recent Eurobarometer data, we study how structural gender stratification in terms of (re)production (i.a. women’s labor market participation and educational attainment) relates to gender differences in highbrow cultural consumption in the 28 EU countries anno 2013. Preliminary results indicate that the gender gap in highbrow cultural participation varies between EU countries and that this is partly explained by structural gender inequalities in terms of (re)production. Thus, our contribution highlights the importance of context to understand gender differences—and their implications—in cultural participation.
Keywords
multilevel analysis, cross-national comparison, Highbrow cultural participation, structural gender inequality

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Lagaert, Susan, and Henk Roose. “Structural Gender Inequalities and the Gender Gap in Highbrow Cultural Consumption: a Cross-national Comparative Perspective.” European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network Interim Meeting, Abstracts. 2014. Print.
APA
Lagaert, S., & Roose, H. (2014). Structural gender inequalities and the gender gap in highbrow cultural consumption: a cross-national comparative perspective. European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network interim meeting, Abstracts. Presented at the European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network interim meeting.
Chicago author-date
Lagaert, Susan, and Henk Roose. 2014. “Structural Gender Inequalities and the Gender Gap in Highbrow Cultural Consumption: a Cross-national Comparative Perspective.” In European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network Interim Meeting, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lagaert, Susan, and Henk Roose. 2014. “Structural Gender Inequalities and the Gender Gap in Highbrow Cultural Consumption: a Cross-national Comparative Perspective.” In European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network Interim Meeting, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
Lagaert S, Roose H. Structural gender inequalities and the gender gap in highbrow cultural consumption: a cross-national comparative perspective. European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network interim meeting, Abstracts. 2014.
IEEE
[1]
S. Lagaert and H. Roose, “Structural gender inequalities and the gender gap in highbrow cultural consumption: a cross-national comparative perspective,” in European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network interim meeting, Abstracts, Porto, Portugal, 2014.
@inproceedings{5699433,
  abstract     = {One of the most consistent findings in the empirical study of cultural consumption is that women participate more often in highbrow cultural activities than men. In the 1980s, Randall Collins claimed that women’s higher rate of highbrow cultural consumption is related to the gendered division of labor: women are in charge of the status production and cultural reproduction within the household and men provide economic resources (i.e. class production) in the workplace. However, not only individual-level differences, but also macro-level gender inequalities in the organization of production (i.e. economic position of men and women) and reproduction (i.e. childbirth and parenting) constitute the opportunity structure for women’s cultural participation, because these structural inequalities reflect gender norms concerning women’s proper role in the family and the labor market. Yet, the impact of these macro-level inequalities on the gender gap in cultural consumption has received little empirical attention. Using multilevel analyses of recent Eurobarometer data, we study how structural gender stratification in terms of (re)production (i.a. women’s labor market participation and educational attainment) relates to gender differences in highbrow cultural consumption in the 28 EU countries anno 2013. Preliminary results indicate that the gender gap in highbrow cultural participation varies between EU countries and that this is partly explained by structural gender inequalities in terms of (re)production. Thus, our contribution highlights the importance of context to understand gender differences—and their implications—in cultural participation.},
  author       = {Lagaert, Susan and Roose, Henk},
  booktitle    = {European Sociological Association Consumption Research Network interim meeting, Abstracts},
  keywords     = {multilevel analysis,cross-national comparison,Highbrow cultural participation,structural gender inequality},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Porto, Portugal},
  title        = {Structural gender inequalities and the gender gap in highbrow cultural consumption: a cross-national comparative perspective},
  year         = {2014},
}