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From strategy to operations and vice-versa: a bridge that needs an Island

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Abstract
The Information Systems support particularly for Tactical Management is not an explicit or distinct term. There are many concepts and artifacts that are providing contemporary foundations for Information systems in the companies, both in theory and in practice. We tried to analyze different approaches, in order to determine their support specifically for tactical management. Out of this attempt, the realization is that these seemingly overarching bridges from Operations to Strategy and vice-versa appear to be overshooting an important island - the tactical management level, particularly in recognizing its distinct characteristics to be served with adjusted concepts and solutions. We see tactical management as the managerial function that implements strategies, by deploying and utilizing specific resources from the operational level in order to gain that specific competitive advantage prescribed in the strategy. The diversity of approaches and tools is provided for the strategic and overwhelmingly for operational management issues. This theoretical research is analyzing the specifics of the Sense-and-Respond Framework on a tactical level towards perfecting the sensing part of it (in terms of sustaining "low latency" (instead of operational "no latency") and striving for tactical need for "right-time" (instead of the current and hot operational "real-time") information), and how it is being closed in theory and practice on a strategic, tactical and operational level with 'endings'. Also, the tactical management characteristic of working in unpredicted environment and needing high adaptability, requires involvement of concepts and approaches that provide adaptability such as, in our opinion, the Sense-and-Respond managerial concept and the SIDA loop. To some extent, tactical management is being assimilated either by strategy or by operations, as this research confirms. Hopefully, we will result with increased perceptiveness that tactical management needs special theoretical and practical focus and output propositions. The specific sensing and interpreting, deciding and acting, in the role of a tactical manager is neither only automatic, data-capturing process nor a person-independent or company-independent one. If, and after this viewpoint is shared, much more efforts will be streamlined in the tactical management "how" to do "what" is expected, on theoretical and on practical level.
Keywords
sense-and-respond loop, tactical management, low latency, right-time information

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MLA
Petrevska Nechkoska, Renata, Geert Poels, and Gjorgji Manceski. “From Strategy to Operations and Vice-versa: a Bridge That Needs an Island.” Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation. Ed. Jan Devos & Steven De Haes. Reading, United Kingdom: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2014. 190–197. Print.
APA
Petrevska Nechkoska, R., Poels, G., & Manceski, G. (2014). From strategy to operations and vice-versa: a bridge that needs an Island. In J. Devos & S. De Haes (Eds.), Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation (pp. 190–197). Presented at the 8th European Conference on IS Management and Evaluation (ECIME), Reading, United Kingdom: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited.
Chicago author-date
Petrevska Nechkoska, Renata, Geert Poels, and Gjorgji Manceski. 2014. “From Strategy to Operations and Vice-versa: a Bridge That Needs an Island.” In Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation, ed. Jan Devos and Steven De Haes, 190–197. Reading, United Kingdom: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Petrevska Nechkoska, Renata, Geert Poels, and Gjorgji Manceski. 2014. “From Strategy to Operations and Vice-versa: a Bridge That Needs an Island.” In Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation, ed. Jan Devos and Steven De Haes, 190–197. Reading, United Kingdom: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited.
Vancouver
1.
Petrevska Nechkoska R, Poels G, Manceski G. From strategy to operations and vice-versa: a bridge that needs an Island. In: Devos J, De Haes S, editors. Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation. Reading, United Kingdom: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited; 2014. p. 190–7.
IEEE
[1]
R. Petrevska Nechkoska, G. Poels, and G. Manceski, “From strategy to operations and vice-versa: a bridge that needs an Island,” in Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation, Ghent, Belgium, 2014, pp. 190–197.
@inproceedings{5697112,
  abstract     = {The Information Systems support particularly for Tactical Management is not an explicit or distinct term. There are many concepts and artifacts that are providing contemporary foundations for Information systems in the companies, both in theory and in practice. We tried to analyze different approaches, in order to determine their support specifically for tactical management. Out of this attempt, the realization is that these seemingly overarching bridges from Operations to Strategy and vice-versa appear to be overshooting an important island - the tactical management level, particularly in recognizing its distinct characteristics to be served with adjusted concepts and solutions. We see tactical management as the managerial function that implements strategies, by deploying and utilizing specific resources from the operational level in order to gain that specific competitive advantage prescribed in the strategy. The diversity of approaches and tools is provided for the strategic and overwhelmingly for operational management issues. This theoretical research is analyzing the specifics of the Sense-and-Respond Framework on a tactical level towards perfecting the sensing part of it (in terms of sustaining "low latency" (instead of operational "no latency") and striving for tactical need for "right-time" (instead of the current and hot operational "real-time") information), and how it is being closed in theory and practice on a strategic, tactical and operational level with 'endings'. Also, the tactical management characteristic of working in unpredicted environment and needing high adaptability, requires involvement of concepts and approaches that provide adaptability such as, in our opinion, the Sense-and-Respond managerial concept and the SIDA loop. To some extent, tactical management is being assimilated either by strategy or by operations, as this research confirms. Hopefully, we will result with increased perceptiveness that tactical management needs special theoretical and practical focus and output propositions. The specific sensing and interpreting, deciding and acting, in the role of a tactical manager is neither only automatic, data-capturing process nor a person-independent or company-independent one. If, and after this viewpoint is shared, much more efforts will be streamlined in the tactical management "how" to do "what" is expected, on theoretical and on practical level.},
  author       = {Petrevska Nechkoska, Renata and Poels, Geert and Manceski, Gjorgji},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation},
  editor       = {Devos, Jan and De Haes, Steven},
  isbn         = {9781910309438},
  issn         = {2048-8912},
  keywords     = {sense-and-respond loop,tactical management,low latency,right-time information},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  pages        = {190--197},
  publisher    = {Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited},
  title        = {From strategy to operations and vice-versa: a bridge that needs an Island},
  year         = {2014},
}

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