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No pain, no gain: the affective valence of congruency conditions changes following a successful response

Nathalie Schouppe (UGent) , Senne Braem (UGent) , Jan De Houwer (UGent) , Massimo Silvetti (UGent) , Tom Verguts (UGent) , Richard Ridderinkhof and Wim Notebaert (UGent)
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The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
Abstract
The cognitive control theory of Botvinick, Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, 7, 356–366 (2007) integrates cognitive and affective control processes by emphasizing the aversive nature of cognitive conflict. Using an affective priming paradigm, we replicate earlier results showing that incongruent trials, relative to congruent trials, are indeed perceived as more aversive (Dreisbach & Fischer, Brain and Cognition, 78(2), 94–98 (2012)). Importantly, however, in two experiments we demonstrate that this effect is reversed following successful responses; correctly responding to incongruent trials engendered relatively more positive affect than correctly responding to congruent trials. The results are discussed in light of a recent computational model by Silvetti, Seurinck, and Verguts, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 5:75 (2011) where it is assumed that outcome expectancies are more negative for incongruent trials than congruent trials. Consequently, the intrinsic reward (prediction error) following successful completion is larger for incongruent than congruent trials. These findings divulge a novel perspective on 'cognitive' adaptations to conflict.
Keywords
Anterior cingulate cortex, MODULATES COGNITIVE CONTROL, Conflict adaptation, Intrinsic reward, Reward prediction error, Affective priming, Conflict, Cognitive control, CONTINGENCY, INTERFERENCE, COMPATIBILITY, JUSTIFICATION, INTEGRATION, TASK, CINGULATE CORTEX, STIMULUS-RESPONSE, CONFLICT ADAPTATION

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Schouppe, Nathalie, Senne Braem, Jan De Houwer, Massimo Silvetti, Tom Verguts, Richard Ridderinkhof, and Wim Notebaert. 2015. “No Pain, No Gain: The Affective Valence of Congruency Conditions Changes Following a Successful Response.” Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience 15 (1): 251–261.
APA
Schouppe, N., Braem, S., De Houwer, J., Silvetti, M., Verguts, T., Ridderinkhof, R., & Notebaert, W. (2015). No pain, no gain: the affective valence of congruency conditions changes following a successful response. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 15(1), 251–261.
Vancouver
1.
Schouppe N, Braem S, De Houwer J, Silvetti M, Verguts T, Ridderinkhof R, et al. No pain, no gain: the affective valence of congruency conditions changes following a successful response. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE. 2015;15(1):251–61.
MLA
Schouppe, Nathalie, Senne Braem, Jan De Houwer, et al. “No Pain, No Gain: The Affective Valence of Congruency Conditions Changes Following a Successful Response.” COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 15.1 (2015): 251–261. Print.
@article{5695403,
  abstract     = {The cognitive control theory of Botvinick, Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, 7, 356–366 (2007) integrates cognitive and affective control processes by emphasizing the aversive nature of cognitive conflict. Using an affective priming paradigm, we replicate earlier results showing that incongruent trials, relative to congruent trials, are indeed perceived as more aversive (Dreisbach & Fischer, Brain and Cognition, 78(2), 94–98 (2012)). Importantly, however, in two experiments we demonstrate that this effect is reversed following successful responses; correctly responding to incongruent trials engendered relatively more positive affect than correctly responding to congruent trials. The results are discussed in light of a recent computational model by Silvetti, Seurinck, and Verguts, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 5:75 (2011) where it is assumed that outcome expectancies are more negative for incongruent trials than congruent trials. Consequently, the intrinsic reward (prediction error) following successful completion is larger for incongruent than congruent trials. These findings divulge a novel perspective on 'cognitive' adaptations to conflict.},
  author       = {Schouppe, Nathalie and Braem, Senne and De Houwer, Jan and Silvetti, Massimo and Verguts, Tom and Ridderinkhof, Richard and Notebaert, Wim},
  issn         = {1530-7026},
  journal      = {COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE},
  keywords     = {Anterior cingulate cortex,MODULATES COGNITIVE CONTROL,Conflict adaptation,Intrinsic reward,Reward prediction error,Affective priming,Conflict,Cognitive control,CONTINGENCY,INTERFERENCE,COMPATIBILITY,JUSTIFICATION,INTEGRATION,TASK,CINGULATE CORTEX,STIMULUS-RESPONSE,CONFLICT ADAPTATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {251--261},
  title        = {No pain, no gain: the affective valence of congruency conditions changes following a successful response},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-014-0318-3},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2015},
}

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