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DHXCT: the use of helical X-ray CT in dendro-research

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Abstract
X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) has become a well-established technique in many fields of science. Its application in wood research is also increasing considerably. Thanks to the non-destructive nature of the imaging process as well as the internal view on the three-dimensional structure, it is one of the pre-eminent techniques for multi-scale studies of wood. With standard cone-beam tomography, however, long samples with limited cross-sectional dimensions are hard to scan at high resolution. Stacked scanning and volume stitching are necessary for such samples. Tree-ring research mainly uses increment cores or generally speaking pith-to-bark trajectories which are typically long but with rather small cross-sectional dimensions. Such samples, therefore, could benefit from other acquisition routines, such as the helical scanning protocol. The sample is not only rotated 360° but is also moved along the z-axis, resulting in a helical movement. We will show how helical X-CT (HXCT) can be of use in tree-ring research, giving examples of its use on oak (Quercus spp.), limba (Terminalia superba) and teak (Tectona grandis). Custom-made sample holders enable scanning of several pith-to-bark trajectories sawn from wood disks simultaneously. Reconstructed volumes can be converted to absolute densities without classical time-consuming calibration methods and density profiles can be obtained. Furthermore, the 3D volume can also be used for accurate ring width measurements taking into account ring and grain angle. In some cases, quantitative wood anatomical measurements are also feasible. Finally, dedicated scans at higher resolution can resolve finer anatomical details.

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Chicago
Van den Bulcke, Jan, Erik LG Wernersson, Manuel Dierick, Denis Van Loo, Bert Masschaele, Loes Brabant, Matthieu Boone, et al. 2014. “DHXCT: The Use of Helical X-ray CT in Dendro-research.” In Dendrochronology, 9th International Conference, Abstracts.
APA
Van den Bulcke, J., Wernersson, E. L., Dierick, M., Van Loo, D., Masschaele, B., Brabant, L., Boone, M., et al. (2014). DHXCT: the use of helical X-ray CT in dendro-research. Dendrochronology, 9th International conference, Abstracts. Presented at the 9th International conference on Dendrochronology.
Vancouver
1.
Van den Bulcke J, Wernersson EL, Dierick M, Van Loo D, Masschaele B, Brabant L, et al. DHXCT: the use of helical X-ray CT in dendro-research. Dendrochronology, 9th International conference, Abstracts. 2014.
MLA
Van den Bulcke, Jan, Erik LG Wernersson, Manuel Dierick, et al. “DHXCT: The Use of Helical X-ray CT in Dendro-research.” Dendrochronology, 9th International Conference, Abstracts. 2014. Print.
@inproceedings{5675166,
  abstract     = {X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) has become a well-established technique in many fields of science. Its application in wood research is also increasing considerably. Thanks to the non-destructive nature of the imaging process as well as the internal view on the three-dimensional structure, it is one of the pre-eminent techniques for multi-scale studies of wood. With standard cone-beam tomography, however, long samples with limited cross-sectional dimensions are hard to scan at high resolution. Stacked scanning and volume stitching are necessary for such samples. Tree-ring research mainly uses increment cores or generally speaking pith-to-bark trajectories which are typically long but with rather small cross-sectional dimensions. Such samples, therefore, could benefit from other acquisition routines, such as the helical scanning protocol. The sample is not only rotated 360{\textdegree} but is also moved along the z-axis, resulting in a helical movement. We will show how helical X-CT (HXCT) can be of use in tree-ring research, giving examples of its use on oak (Quercus spp.), limba (Terminalia superba) and teak (Tectona grandis). Custom-made sample holders enable scanning of several pith-to-bark trajectories sawn from wood disks simultaneously. Reconstructed volumes can be converted to absolute densities without classical time-consuming calibration methods and density profiles can be obtained. Furthermore, the 3D volume can also be used for accurate ring width measurements taking into account ring and grain angle. In some cases, quantitative wood anatomical measurements are also feasible. Finally, dedicated scans at higher resolution can resolve finer anatomical details.},
  author       = {Van den Bulcke, Jan and Wernersson, Erik LG and Dierick, Manuel and Van Loo, Denis and Masschaele, Bert and Brabant, Loes and Boone, Matthieu and Van Hoorebeke, Luc and Haneca, Kristof and De Ridder, Maaike and Beeckman, Hans and DIE, Agathe and Brun, Anders and Hendriks, Cris L Luengo and Van Acker, Joris},
  booktitle    = {Dendrochronology, 9th International conference, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Melbourne},
  title        = {DHXCT: the use of helical X-ray CT in dendro-research},
  year         = {2014},
}