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Role of cell-cell adhesion complexes in embryonic stem cell biology

Tim Pieters (UGent) and Frans Van Roy (UGent)
(2014) JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE. 127(12). p.2603-2613
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Abstract
Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can self-renew or differentiate into any cell type within an organism. Here, we focus on the roles of cadherins and catenins - their cytoplasmic scaffold proteins - in the fate, maintenance and differentiation of mammalian ESCs. E-cadherin is a master stem cell regulator that is required for both mouse ESC (mESC) maintenance and differentiation. E-cadherin interacts with key components of the naive stemness pathway and ablating it prevents stem cells from forming well-differentiated teratomas or contributing to chimeric animals. In addition, depleting E-cadherin converts naive mouse ESCs into primed epiblast-like stem cells (EpiSCs). In line with this, a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells towards induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), leading to downregulation of N-cadherin and acquisition of high E-cadherin levels. beta-catenin exerts a dual function; it acts in cadherin-based adhesion and in WNT signaling and, although WNT signaling is important for stemness, the adhesive function of beta-catenin might be crucial for maintaining the naive state of stem cells. In addition, evidence is rising that other junctional proteins are also important in ESC biology. Thus, precisely regulated levels and activities of several junctional proteins, in particular E-cadherin, safeguard naive pluripotency and are a prerequisite for complete somatic cell reprogramming.
Keywords
Signaling pathways, Embryonic stem cells, Junctional proteins, Catenins, Cadherins, Epiblast stem cells, Induced pluripotent stem cells, Stemness, Pluripotency, Self-renewal, Stem cell differentiation, Somatic cell reprogramming, Mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, Teratomas, Chimeric mouse embryos, LEUKEMIA INHIBITORY FACTOR, GROUND-STATE PLURIPOTENCY, TO-EPITHELIAL TRANSITION, IN-VIVO DIFFERENTIATION, E-CADHERIN, SELF-RENEWAL, MOUSE EMBRYOS, BETA-CATENIN, ALPHA-CATENIN, GAP-JUNCTIONS

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Citation

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MLA
Pieters, Tim, and Frans Van Roy. “Role of Cell-cell Adhesion Complexes in Embryonic Stem Cell Biology.” JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE 127.12 (2014): 2603–2613. Print.
APA
Pieters, Tim, & Van Roy, F. (2014). Role of cell-cell adhesion complexes in embryonic stem cell biology. JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE, 127(12), 2603–2613.
Chicago author-date
Pieters, Tim, and Frans Van Roy. 2014. “Role of Cell-cell Adhesion Complexes in Embryonic Stem Cell Biology.” Journal of Cell Science 127 (12): 2603–2613.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Pieters, Tim, and Frans Van Roy. 2014. “Role of Cell-cell Adhesion Complexes in Embryonic Stem Cell Biology.” Journal of Cell Science 127 (12): 2603–2613.
Vancouver
1.
Pieters T, Van Roy F. Role of cell-cell adhesion complexes in embryonic stem cell biology. JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE. 2014;127(12):2603–13.
IEEE
[1]
T. Pieters and F. Van Roy, “Role of cell-cell adhesion complexes in embryonic stem cell biology,” JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE, vol. 127, no. 12, pp. 2603–2613, 2014.
@article{5668413,
  abstract     = {Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can self-renew or differentiate into any cell type within an organism. Here, we focus on the roles of cadherins and catenins - their cytoplasmic scaffold proteins - in the fate, maintenance and differentiation of mammalian ESCs. E-cadherin is a master stem cell regulator that is required for both mouse ESC (mESC) maintenance and differentiation. E-cadherin interacts with key components of the naive stemness pathway and ablating it prevents stem cells from forming well-differentiated teratomas or contributing to chimeric animals. In addition, depleting E-cadherin converts naive mouse ESCs into primed epiblast-like stem cells (EpiSCs). In line with this, a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells towards induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), leading to downregulation of N-cadherin and acquisition of high E-cadherin levels. beta-catenin exerts a dual function; it acts in cadherin-based adhesion and in WNT signaling and, although WNT signaling is important for stemness, the adhesive function of beta-catenin might be crucial for maintaining the naive state of stem cells. In addition, evidence is rising that other junctional proteins are also important in ESC biology. Thus, precisely regulated levels and activities of several junctional proteins, in particular E-cadherin, safeguard naive pluripotency and are a prerequisite for complete somatic cell reprogramming.},
  author       = {Pieters, Tim and Van Roy, Frans},
  issn         = {0021-9533},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE},
  keywords     = {Signaling pathways,Embryonic stem cells,Junctional proteins,Catenins,Cadherins,Epiblast stem cells,Induced pluripotent stem cells,Stemness,Pluripotency,Self-renewal,Stem cell differentiation,Somatic cell reprogramming,Mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition,Teratomas,Chimeric mouse embryos,LEUKEMIA INHIBITORY FACTOR,GROUND-STATE PLURIPOTENCY,TO-EPITHELIAL TRANSITION,IN-VIVO DIFFERENTIATION,E-CADHERIN,SELF-RENEWAL,MOUSE EMBRYOS,BETA-CATENIN,ALPHA-CATENIN,GAP-JUNCTIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2603--2613},
  title        = {Role of cell-cell adhesion complexes in embryonic stem cell biology},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.146720},
  volume       = {127},
  year         = {2014},
}

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