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The history of the generation of cubic graphs

Gunnar Brinkmann (UGent) , Jan Goedgebeur (UGent) and Nicolas Van Cleemput (UGent)
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Abstract
A cubic graph is a simple graph in which each vertex is adjacent to three other vertices. Cubic graphs have since long received much attention from both mathematicians and chemists. In chemistry, cubic graphs can be used to model carbon networks, since carbon often binds with three C atoms. This makes lists of cubic graphs interesting as lists of possible molecules that can be studied for their chemical properties. Examples of this are the famous fullerenes and cyclopolyenes. For several important open conjectures in mathematics, it can be proven that if they are wrong, the smallest counterexample is a cubic graph. This makes lists of cubic graphs interesting as a possible source for counterexamples.

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Chicago
Brinkmann, Gunnar, Jan Goedgebeur, and Nicolas Van Cleemput. 2013. “The History of the Generation of Cubic Graphs.” International Journal of Chemical Modeling 5 (2-3): 203–225.
APA
Brinkmann, Gunnar, Goedgebeur, J., & Van Cleemput, N. (2013). The history of the generation of cubic graphs. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL MODELING, 5(2-3), 203–225.
Vancouver
1.
Brinkmann G, Goedgebeur J, Van Cleemput N. The history of the generation of cubic graphs. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL MODELING. 2013;5(2-3):203–25.
MLA
Brinkmann, Gunnar, Jan Goedgebeur, and Nicolas Van Cleemput. “The History of the Generation of Cubic Graphs.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL MODELING 5.2-3 (2013): 203–225. Print.
@article{5663375,
  abstract     = {A cubic graph is a simple graph in which each vertex is adjacent to three other vertices. Cubic graphs have since long received much attention from both mathematicians and chemists. In chemistry, cubic graphs can be used to model carbon networks, since carbon often binds with three C atoms. This makes lists of cubic graphs interesting as lists of possible molecules that can be studied for their chemical properties. Examples of this are the famous fullerenes and cyclopolyenes. For several important open conjectures in mathematics, it can be proven that if they are wrong, the smallest counterexample is a cubic graph. This makes lists of cubic graphs interesting as a possible source for counterexamples.},
  author       = {Brinkmann, Gunnar and Goedgebeur, Jan and Van Cleemput, Nicolas},
  issn         = {1941-3955},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL MODELING},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-3},
  pages        = {203--225},
  title        = {The history of the generation of cubic graphs},
  url          = {https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=49526},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2013},
}