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The dock-in model of music culture and cross-cultural perception

Thomas Fritz UGent (2013) MUSIC PERCEPTION. 30(5). p.511-516
abstract
This paper proposes a model that aims to illustrate how different human music cultures intersect and "dock in" to a set of music features that are universally perceived, while also displaying culture-specific features that must be learned. The model emphasizes that over historic time the music in a given culture can "dock into" and "dock out of" cues that are universally perceived, shifting its potential for cross-cultural perception and interaction. While this model accounts for music ethnological evidence reviewed here, it also explains why universals of music perception cannot simply be determined by specifying the common denominator between the formal music features of all cultures. This report suggests that the Dock-in Model can be generalized to account for cross-cultural perception more generally.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EXPRESSION, SELF, EVOLUTION, COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE, EMOTION RECOGNITION, emotional expression, cross-cultural, communication, Mafa, universal
journal title
MUSIC PERCEPTION
Music Percept.
volume
30
issue
5
pages
511 - 516
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000321090600005
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
1.75 (2013)
JCR rank
43/83 (2013)
JCR quartile
3 (2013)
ISSN
0730-7829
DOI
10.1525/MP.2013.30.5.511
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
5660667
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-5660667
date created
2014-07-18 14:59:07
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:47:30
@article{5660667,
  abstract     = {This paper proposes a model that aims to illustrate how different human music cultures intersect and {\textacutedbl}dock in{\textacutedbl} to a set of music features that are universally perceived, while also displaying culture-specific features that must be learned. The model emphasizes that over historic time the music in a given culture can {\textacutedbl}dock into{\textacutedbl} and {\textacutedbl}dock out of{\textacutedbl} cues that are universally perceived, shifting its potential for cross-cultural perception and interaction. While this model accounts for music ethnological evidence reviewed here, it also explains why universals of music perception cannot simply be determined by specifying the common denominator between the formal music features of all cultures. This report suggests that the Dock-in Model can be generalized to account for cross-cultural perception more generally.},
  author       = {Fritz, Thomas},
  issn         = {0730-7829},
  journal      = {MUSIC PERCEPTION},
  keyword      = {EXPRESSION,SELF,EVOLUTION,COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE,EMOTION RECOGNITION,emotional expression,cross-cultural,communication,Mafa,universal},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {511--516},
  title        = {The dock-in model of music culture and cross-cultural perception},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/MP.2013.30.5.511},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Fritz, Thomas. 2013. “The Dock-in Model of Music Culture and Cross-cultural Perception.” Music Perception 30 (5): 511–516.
APA
Fritz, T. (2013). The dock-in model of music culture and cross-cultural perception. MUSIC PERCEPTION, 30(5), 511–516.
Vancouver
1.
Fritz T. The dock-in model of music culture and cross-cultural perception. MUSIC PERCEPTION. 2013;30(5):511–6.
MLA
Fritz, Thomas. “The Dock-in Model of Music Culture and Cross-cultural Perception.” MUSIC PERCEPTION 30.5 (2013): 511–516. Print.