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Semantic transparency and masked morphological priming: The case of prefixed words

Kevin Diependaele UGent, Dominiek Sandra and Jonathan Grainger (2009) Memory & cognition. 37(6). p.895-908
abstract
In four lexical decision experiments we investigated masked morphological priming with Dutch prefixed words. Reliable effects of morphological relatedness were obtained with visual primes and visual targets in the absence of effects due to pure form overlap. In certain conditions, priming effects were significantly greater with semantically transparent prefixed primes (e.g., rename-name) relative to the priming effects obtained with semantically opaque prefixed words (e.g., relate-late), even with very brief (40ms) prime durations. With visual primes and auditory targets (cross-modal priming), significant facilitation was found for all related prime conditions independently of whether or not primes were morphologically related to targets. The results are interpreted within a bimodal hierarchical model of word recognition where morphological effects arise through the interplay of sublexical (morpho-orthographic) and supralexical (morpho-semantic) representations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
journal title
Memory & cognition
Mem. cogn.
volume
37
issue
6
pages
895 - 908
place of publication
Austin, Texas ; UNITED STATES
Web of Science type
article
Web of Science id
000269406100016
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
1.726 (2009)
JCR rank
34/71 (2009)
JCR quartile
2 (2009)
ISSN
1532-5946
0090-502X
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
538231
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-538231
date created
2009-04-06 09:38:26
date last changed
2010-08-03 12:05:45
@article{538231,
  abstract     = {In four lexical decision experiments we investigated masked morphological priming with Dutch prefixed words. Reliable effects of morphological relatedness were obtained with visual primes and visual targets in the absence of effects due to pure form overlap. In certain conditions, priming effects were significantly greater with semantically transparent prefixed primes (e.g., rename-name) relative to the priming effects obtained with semantically opaque prefixed words (e.g., relate-late), even with very brief (40ms) prime durations. With visual primes and auditory targets (cross-modal priming), significant facilitation was found for all related prime conditions independently of whether or not primes were morphologically related to targets. The results are interpreted within a bimodal hierarchical model of word recognition where morphological effects arise through the interplay of sublexical (morpho-orthographic) and supralexical (morpho-semantic) representations.},
  author       = {Diependaele, Kevin and Sandra, Dominiek and Grainger, Jonathan},
  issn         = {1532-5946},
  journal      = {Memory \& cognition},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {895--908},
  title        = {Semantic transparency and masked morphological priming: The case of prefixed words},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Diependaele, Kevin, Dominiek Sandra, and Jonathan Grainger. 2009. “Semantic Transparency and Masked Morphological Priming: The Case of Prefixed Words.” Memory & Cognition 37 (6): 895–908.
APA
Diependaele, K., Sandra, D., & Grainger, J. (2009). Semantic transparency and masked morphological priming: The case of prefixed words. Memory & cognition, 37(6), 895–908.
Vancouver
1.
Diependaele K, Sandra D, Grainger J. Semantic transparency and masked morphological priming: The case of prefixed words. Memory & cognition. Austin, Texas ; UNITED STATES; 2009;37(6):895–908.
MLA
Diependaele, Kevin, Dominiek Sandra, and Jonathan Grainger. “Semantic Transparency and Masked Morphological Priming: The Case of Prefixed Words.” Memory & cognition 37.6 (2009): 895–908. Print.