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Congruency sequence effects without feature integration or contingency learning confounds

(2014) PLOS ONE. 9(7).
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Abstract
The congruency effect in distracter interference (e. g., Stroop) tasks is often reduced after incongruent trials, relative to congruent trials. It has been proposed that this congruency sequence effect (CSE) results from trial-by-trial adjustments of attention, which are triggered by changes in response conflict, expectancy, or negative affect. Hence, a large literature has developed to investigate the source(s) of attention adaptation in distracter interference tasks. Recent work, however, suggests that CSEs may stem from feature integration and/or contingency learning processes that are confounded with congruency sequence in the vast majority of distracter interference tasks. By combining an established method for measuring CSEs in the absence of these learning and memory confounds with a prime-probe task, we observed robust CSEs in two experiments. These findings provide strong evidence of CSEs independent of learning and memory confounds, which might be explainable by trial-by-trial adjustments of attention. They also reveal a highly effective approach for observing CSEs independent of the typical confounds, which will facilitate future studies of how people adapt to distraction.
Keywords
PROPORTION CONGRUENT, INTERFERENCE, MIXED BLOCKS, MODULATIONS, FLANKER TASK, IDENTIFYING STIMULI, CONFLICT ADAPTATION, COGNITIVE CONTROL, ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, DIFFERENT PERCEPTUAL CATEGORIES

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Schmidt, James, and DH Weissman. 2014. “Congruency Sequence Effects Without Feature Integration or Contingency Learning Confounds.” Plos One 9 (7).
APA
Schmidt, J., & Weissman, D. (2014). Congruency sequence effects without feature integration or contingency learning confounds. PLOS ONE, 9(7).
Vancouver
1.
Schmidt J, Weissman D. Congruency sequence effects without feature integration or contingency learning confounds. PLOS ONE. 2014;9(7).
MLA
Schmidt, James, and DH Weissman. “Congruency Sequence Effects Without Feature Integration or Contingency Learning Confounds.” PLOS ONE 9.7 (2014): n. pag. Print.
@article{5327696,
  abstract     = {The congruency effect in distracter interference (e. g., Stroop) tasks is often reduced after incongruent trials, relative to congruent trials. It has been proposed that this congruency sequence effect (CSE) results from trial-by-trial adjustments of attention, which are triggered by changes in response conflict, expectancy, or negative affect. Hence, a large literature has developed to investigate the source(s) of attention adaptation in distracter interference tasks. Recent work, however, suggests that CSEs may stem from feature integration and/or contingency learning processes that are confounded with congruency sequence in the vast majority of distracter interference tasks. By combining an established method for measuring CSEs in the absence of these learning and memory confounds with a prime-probe task, we observed robust CSEs in two experiments. These findings provide strong evidence of CSEs independent of learning and memory confounds, which might be explainable by trial-by-trial adjustments of attention. They also reveal a highly effective approach for observing CSEs independent of the typical confounds, which will facilitate future studies of how people adapt to distraction.},
  articleno    = {e102337},
  author       = {Schmidt, James and Weissman, DH},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keywords     = {PROPORTION CONGRUENT,INTERFERENCE,MIXED BLOCKS,MODULATIONS,FLANKER TASK,IDENTIFYING STIMULI,CONFLICT ADAPTATION,COGNITIVE CONTROL,ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX,DIFFERENT PERCEPTUAL CATEGORIES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {36},
  title        = {Congruency sequence effects without feature integration or contingency learning confounds},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102337},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2014},
}

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