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An interdisciplinary community diagnosis experience in an undergraduate medical curriculum: development at Ghent University

Bruno Art UGent, Leen De Roo UGent, Sara Willems UGent and Jan De Maeseneer UGent (2008) ACADEMIC MEDICINE. 83(7). p.675-683
abstract
Since 2002, the medical curriculum at Ghent University has incorporated a community diagnosis exercise, teaming medical students with master of social work and social welfare studies students. The course focuses on the interaction between the individual and the community in matters of health and health care. During one week, small groups of students visit patients and their caregivers in six underserved urban neighborhoods, and they combine these experiences with public health data, to develop a community diagnosis. Local family physicians and social workers monitor sessions, The course requires students to design an intervention tackling one community health issue. At the end of the course, the students present their diagnoses and interventions to community workers and policy makers who provide feedback on the results. In the authors' experience, medical and social work students all value the joint learning experience, The occasional culture clash is an added value. The one-week course is very intensive for students, mentors, and cooperating organizations. Although students criticize time restraints, they feel that they reach the outlined objectives, and they rate the overall experience as very positive. The authors find that this interdisciplinary, community-oriented exercise allows students to appreciate health problems as they occur in society, giving them insight into the interaction of the local community with health and health care agencies. Combining public health data with experiences originating from a patient encounter mimics real-life primary care situations. This campus-community collaboration contributes to the social accountability of the university.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HEALTH, ORIENTED PRIMARY-CARE, EDUCATION, STUDENTS
journal title
ACADEMIC MEDICINE
Acad. Med.
volume
83
issue
7
pages
675 - 683
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000267654200010
JCR category
EDUCATION, SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES
JCR impact factor
1.867 (2008)
JCR rank
2/23 (2008)
JCR quartile
1 (2008)
ISSN
1040-2446
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
530604
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-530604
date created
2009-03-25 15:10:02
date last changed
2011-09-21 13:36:23
@article{530604,
  abstract     = {Since 2002, the medical curriculum at Ghent University has incorporated a community diagnosis exercise, teaming medical students with master of social work and social welfare studies students. The course focuses on the interaction between the individual and the community in matters of health and health care. During one week, small groups of students visit patients and their caregivers in six underserved urban neighborhoods, and they combine these experiences with public health data, to develop a community diagnosis. Local family physicians and social workers monitor sessions, The course requires students to design an intervention tackling one community health issue. At the end of the course, the students present their diagnoses and interventions to community workers and policy makers who provide feedback on the results. In the authors' experience, medical and social work students all value the joint learning experience, The occasional culture clash is an added value. The one-week course is very intensive for students, mentors, and cooperating organizations. Although students criticize time restraints, they feel that they reach the outlined objectives, and they rate the overall experience as very positive. The authors find that this interdisciplinary, community-oriented exercise allows students to appreciate health problems as they occur in society, giving them insight into the interaction of the local community with health and health care agencies. Combining public health data with experiences originating from a patient encounter mimics real-life primary care situations. This campus-community collaboration contributes to the social accountability of the university.},
  author       = {Art, Bruno and De Roo, Leen and Willems, Sara and De Maeseneer, Jan},
  issn         = {1040-2446},
  journal      = {ACADEMIC MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {HEALTH,ORIENTED PRIMARY-CARE,EDUCATION,STUDENTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {675--683},
  title        = {An interdisciplinary community diagnosis experience in an undergraduate medical curriculum: development at Ghent University},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Art, Bruno, Leen De Roo, Sara Willems, and Jan De Maeseneer. 2008. “An Interdisciplinary Community Diagnosis Experience in an Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: Development at Ghent University.” Academic Medicine 83 (7): 675–683.
APA
Art, B., De Roo, L., Willems, S., & De Maeseneer, J. (2008). An interdisciplinary community diagnosis experience in an undergraduate medical curriculum: development at Ghent University. ACADEMIC MEDICINE, 83(7), 675–683.
Vancouver
1.
Art B, De Roo L, Willems S, De Maeseneer J. An interdisciplinary community diagnosis experience in an undergraduate medical curriculum: development at Ghent University. ACADEMIC MEDICINE. 2008;83(7):675–83.
MLA
Art, Bruno, Leen De Roo, Sara Willems, et al. “An Interdisciplinary Community Diagnosis Experience in an Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: Development at Ghent University.” ACADEMIC MEDICINE 83.7 (2008): 675–683. Print.