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Tagging thinking types in asynchronous discussion groups: effects on critical thinking

Tammy Schellens (UGent) , Hilde Van Keer (UGent) , Bram De Wever (UGent) and Martin Valcke (UGent)
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Abstract
The present study focuses on the use of thinking types as a possible way to structure university students' discourse in asynchronous discussion groups and consequently promote their learning. More specifically, the aim of the study is to determine how requiring students to label their contributions by means of De Bono's (1991) thinking hats affects the ongoing critical thinking processes reflected in the discussion. The results suggest that tagging thinking types significantly promotes critical thinking in general and the critical thinking processes during problem identification and problem exploration, in particular. More specifically, it appears that requiring students to reflect on the type of thinking in their contributions stimulates more indepth and focused contributions and, more frequent input of new problem-related information and new ideas for discussion.
Keywords
computer-supported collaborative learning, critical thinking, asynchronous discussion groups, higher education, scripting, DISCUSSIONS, ONLINE, ENVIRONMENT, STUDENT

Citation

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Chicago
Schellens, Tammy, Hilde Van Keer, Bram De Wever, and Martin Valcke. 2009. “Tagging Thinking Types in Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Effects on Critical Thinking.” Interactive Learning Environments 17 (1): 77–94.
APA
Schellens, T., Van Keer, H., De Wever, B., & Valcke, M. (2009). Tagging thinking types in asynchronous discussion groups: effects on critical thinking. INTERACTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS, 17(1), 77–94.
Vancouver
1.
Schellens T, Van Keer H, De Wever B, Valcke M. Tagging thinking types in asynchronous discussion groups: effects on critical thinking. INTERACTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS. 2009;17(1):77–94.
MLA
Schellens, Tammy, Hilde Van Keer, Bram De Wever, et al. “Tagging Thinking Types in Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Effects on Critical Thinking.” INTERACTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS 17.1 (2009): 77–94. Print.
@article{528472,
  abstract     = {The present study focuses on the use of thinking types as a possible way to structure university students' discourse in asynchronous discussion groups and consequently promote their learning. More specifically, the aim of the study is to determine how requiring students to label their contributions by means of De Bono's (1991) thinking hats affects the ongoing critical thinking processes reflected in the discussion. The results suggest that tagging thinking types significantly promotes critical thinking in general and the critical thinking processes during problem identification and problem exploration, in particular. More specifically, it appears that requiring students to reflect on the type of thinking in their contributions stimulates more indepth and focused contributions and, more frequent input of new problem-related information and new ideas for discussion.},
  author       = {Schellens, Tammy and Van Keer, Hilde and De Wever, Bram and Valcke, Martin},
  issn         = {1049-4820},
  journal      = {INTERACTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS},
  keyword      = {computer-supported collaborative learning,critical thinking,asynchronous discussion groups,higher education,scripting,DISCUSSIONS,ONLINE,ENVIRONMENT,STUDENT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {77--94},
  title        = {Tagging thinking types in asynchronous discussion groups: effects on critical thinking},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10494820701651757},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}

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