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Penetrating injuries in dogs and cats: a study of 16 cases

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Abstract
The objective of this retrospective study was to assess radiographical and surgical findings, surgical management and outcome of penetrating injuries in dogs and cats by evaluating patient records. Sixteen patients were identified (15 dogs and one cat), four with gunshot wounds, and 12 with fight wounds (11 with bite wounds, one struck by a claw). The thoracic cavity was affected in six patients, the abdominal cavity in three cases. Both cavities were affected in five dogs and the trachea in two cases. All of the patients with fight wounds were small breed dogs. Multiple injuries to internal organs that required intervention were found surgically after gunshot wounds and a high amount of soft tissue trauma requiring reconstruction was present after fight wounds. Radiography diagnosed body wall disruption in two cases. All of the affected thoracic body walls in the fight group had intercostal muscle disruptions which was diagnosed surgically. Fourteen patients survived until discharge and had a good outcome. In conclusion, penetrating injuries should be explored as they are usually accompanied by severe damage to either the internal organs or to the body wall. A high level of awareness is required to properly determine the degree of trauma of intercostal muscle disruption in thoracic fight wounds.
Keywords
gunshot wounds, Fight wounds, surgical exploration, dog, cat

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MLA
Risselada, M et al. “Penetrating Injuries in Dogs and Cats: a Study of 16 Cases.” VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY 21.5 (2008): 434–439. Print.
APA
Risselada, M, De Rooster, H., Taeymans, O., & van Bree, H. (2008). Penetrating injuries in dogs and cats: a study of 16 cases. VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY, 21(5), 434–439.
Chicago author-date
Risselada, M, Hilde De Rooster, O Taeymans, and Henri van Bree. 2008. “Penetrating Injuries in Dogs and Cats: a Study of 16 Cases.” Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology 21 (5): 434–439.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Risselada, M, Hilde De Rooster, O Taeymans, and Henri van Bree. 2008. “Penetrating Injuries in Dogs and Cats: a Study of 16 Cases.” Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology 21 (5): 434–439.
Vancouver
1.
Risselada M, De Rooster H, Taeymans O, van Bree H. Penetrating injuries in dogs and cats: a study of 16 cases. VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY. 2008;21(5):434–9.
IEEE
[1]
M. Risselada, H. De Rooster, O. Taeymans, and H. van Bree, “Penetrating injuries in dogs and cats: a study of 16 cases,” VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 434–439, 2008.
@article{527833,
  abstract     = {The objective of this retrospective study was to assess radiographical and surgical findings, surgical management and outcome of penetrating injuries in dogs and cats by evaluating patient records. Sixteen patients were identified (15 dogs and one cat), four with gunshot wounds, and 12 with fight wounds (11 with bite wounds, one struck by a claw). The thoracic cavity was affected in six patients, the abdominal cavity in three cases. Both cavities were affected in five dogs and the trachea in two cases. All of the patients with fight wounds were small breed dogs. Multiple injuries to internal organs that required intervention were found surgically after gunshot wounds and a high amount of soft tissue trauma requiring reconstruction was present after fight wounds. Radiography diagnosed body wall disruption in two cases. All of the affected thoracic body walls in the fight group had intercostal muscle disruptions which was diagnosed surgically. Fourteen patients survived until discharge and had a good outcome. In conclusion, penetrating injuries should be explored as they are usually accompanied by severe damage to either the internal organs or to the body wall. A high level of awareness is required to properly determine the degree of trauma of intercostal muscle disruption in thoracic fight wounds.},
  author       = {Risselada, M and De Rooster, Hilde and Taeymans, O and van Bree, Henri},
  issn         = {0932-0814},
  journal      = {VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY},
  keywords     = {gunshot wounds,Fight wounds,surgical exploration,dog,cat},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {434--439},
  title        = {Penetrating injuries in dogs and cats: a study of 16 cases},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-07-02-0019},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2008},
}

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