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Stop the presses: Dissociating a selective from a global mechanism for stopping

Adam Aron and Frederick Verbruggen UGent (2008) Psychological Science. 19. p.1146-1153
abstract
How does one control an inappropriate tendency? Many studies have investigated this question by measuring the speed with which subjects stop an initiated response. Yet the rapid stopping of an initiated response is apparently underpinned by a neurocognitive mechanism that has global effects on multiple tendencies. This limits such studies as models of cognitive control because they do not explain the selectivity of control over particular tendencies that is apparent in everyday life. We hypothesized that subjects employ a selective stopping mechanism when they have foreknowledge of which response to stop, but employ a global stopping mechanism when they do not have such foreknowledge. Comparing foreknowledge and no-foreknowledge conditions, we show that when subjects have foreknowledge, stopping is indeed more selective, as evidenced by less of an effect on the concurrent execution of an alternative response; however, stopping is also slower when subjects have foreknowledge. Thus, selective and global mechanisms of stopping can be dissociated. We suggest that the selective mechanism is used when people maintain the goal of controlling particular responses, whereas the global mechanism is used when it is essential to stop quickly.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
journal title
Psychological Science
Psychol. sci.
volume
19
pages
1146 - 1153
publisher
Cambridge University Press, Blackwell
place of publication
Cambridge, Oxford
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000261530000015
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
4.812 (2008)
JCR rank
6/101 (2008)
JCR quartile
1 (2008)
ISSN
0956-7976
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02216.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
524638
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-524638
date created
2009-03-19 09:28:54
date last changed
2010-05-12 14:30:54
@article{524638,
  abstract     = {How does one control an inappropriate tendency? Many studies have investigated this question by measuring the speed with which subjects stop an initiated response. Yet the rapid stopping of an initiated response is apparently underpinned by a neurocognitive mechanism that has global effects on multiple tendencies. This limits such studies as models of cognitive control because they do not explain the selectivity of control over particular tendencies that is apparent in everyday life. We hypothesized that subjects employ a selective stopping mechanism when they have foreknowledge of which response to stop, but employ a global stopping mechanism when they do not have such foreknowledge. Comparing foreknowledge and no-foreknowledge conditions, we show that when subjects have foreknowledge, stopping is indeed more selective, as evidenced by less of an effect on the concurrent execution of an alternative response; however, stopping is also slower when subjects have foreknowledge. Thus, selective and global mechanisms of stopping can be dissociated. We suggest that the selective mechanism is used when people maintain the goal of controlling particular responses, whereas the global mechanism is used when it is essential to stop quickly.},
  author       = {Aron, Adam and Verbruggen, Frederick},
  issn         = {0956-7976},
  journal      = {Psychological Science},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1146--1153},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press, Blackwell},
  title        = {Stop the presses: Dissociating a selective from a global mechanism for stopping},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02216.x},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Aron, Adam, and Frederick Verbruggen. 2008. “Stop the Presses: Dissociating a Selective from a Global Mechanism for Stopping.” Psychological Science 19: 1146–1153.
APA
Aron, A., & Verbruggen, F. (2008). Stop the presses: Dissociating a selective from a global mechanism for stopping. Psychological Science, 19, 1146–1153.
Vancouver
1.
Aron A, Verbruggen F. Stop the presses: Dissociating a selective from a global mechanism for stopping. Psychological Science. Cambridge, Oxford: Cambridge University Press, Blackwell; 2008;19:1146–53.
MLA
Aron, Adam, and Frederick Verbruggen. “Stop the Presses: Dissociating a Selective from a Global Mechanism for Stopping.” Psychological Science 19 (2008): 1146–1153. Print.