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Long-term aftereffects of response inhibition: Memory retrieval, task goals, and cognitive control

Frederick Verbruggen UGent and Gordon D. Logan (2008) Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance. 34(5). p.1229-1235
abstract
Cognitive control theories attribute control to executive processes that adjust and control behavior online. Theories of automaticity attribute control to memory retrieval. In the present Study, online adjustments and memory retrieval were examined, and their roles in controlling performance in the stop-signal paradigm were elucidated. There was evidence of short-term response time adjustments after unsuccessful stopping. In addition, it was found that memory retrieval can slow responses for 1-20 trials after successful inhibition, which suggests the automatic retrieval of task goals. On the basis of these findings, the authors concluded that cognitive control can rely on both memory retrieval and executive processes.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
journal title
Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
J. exp. psychol. Hum. percept. perform.
volume
34
issue
5
pages
1229 - 1235
publisher
American Psychological Association.
place of publication
Washington, UNITED STATES
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000259553100014
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
2.947 (2008)
JCR rank
13/71 (2008)
JCR quartile
1 (2008)
ISSN
1939-1277
0096-1523
DOI
10.1037/0096-1523.34.5.1229
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
524524
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-524524
date created
2009-03-19 09:19:15
date last changed
2010-01-11 09:09:53
@article{524524,
  abstract     = {Cognitive control theories attribute control to executive processes that adjust and control behavior online. Theories of automaticity attribute control to memory retrieval. In the present Study, online adjustments and memory retrieval were examined, and their roles in controlling performance in the stop-signal paradigm were elucidated. There was evidence of short-term response time adjustments after unsuccessful stopping. In addition, it was found that memory retrieval can slow responses for 1-20 trials after successful inhibition, which suggests the automatic retrieval of task goals. On the basis of these findings, the authors concluded that cognitive control can rely on both memory retrieval and executive processes.},
  author       = {Verbruggen, Frederick and Logan, Gordon D.},
  issn         = {1939-1277},
  journal      = {Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1229--1235},
  publisher    = {American Psychological Association.},
  title        = {Long-term aftereffects of response inhibition: Memory retrieval, task goals, and cognitive control},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0096-1523.34.5.1229},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Verbruggen, Frederick, and Gordon D. Logan. 2008. “Long-term Aftereffects of Response Inhibition: Memory Retrieval, Task Goals, and Cognitive Control.” Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance 34 (5): 1229–1235.
APA
Verbruggen, F., & Logan, G. D. (2008). Long-term aftereffects of response inhibition: Memory retrieval, task goals, and cognitive control. Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance, 34(5), 1229–1235.
Vancouver
1.
Verbruggen F, Logan GD. Long-term aftereffects of response inhibition: Memory retrieval, task goals, and cognitive control. Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance. Washington, UNITED STATES: American Psychological Association.; 2008;34(5):1229–35.
MLA
Verbruggen, Frederick, and Gordon D. Logan. “Long-term Aftereffects of Response Inhibition: Memory Retrieval, Task Goals, and Cognitive Control.” Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance 34.5 (2008): 1229–1235. Print.