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After-effects of goal shifting and response inhibition: A comparison of the stop-change and dual-task paradigms

Frederick Verbruggen UGent and Gordon D. Logan (2008) Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 61(8). p.1151-1159
abstract
In the present study, we tested three hypotheses that account for after-effects of response inhibition and goal shifting: the goal-shifting hypothesis, the reaction time (RT) adjustment hypothesis, and the stimulus-goal association hypothesis. To distinguish between the hypotheses, we examined performance in the stop-change paradigm and the dual-task paradigm. In the stop-change paradigm, we found that responding on no-signal trials slowed down when a stop-change signal was presented on the previous trial. Similarly, in the dual-task paradigm, we found that responding on no-signal trials slowed down when a dual-task signal was presented on the previous trial. However, aftereffects of unsuccessful inhibition or dual-task performance were observed only when the stimulus of the previous trial was repeated. These results are consistent with stimulus-goal association hypothesis, which assumes that the stimulus is associated with the different task goals on signal trials; when the stimulus is repeated, the tasks goal are retrieved, and interference occurs.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
journal title
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Q. J. Exp. Psychol.
volume
61
issue
8
pages
1151 - 1159
publisher
Psychology Press
place of publication
Washington, UNITED STATES
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000258145700004
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
1.76 (2008)
JCR rank
31/71 (2008)
JCR quartile
4 (2008)
ISSN
1747-0218
DOI
10.1080/17470210801994971
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
524475
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-524475
date created
2009-03-19 09:15:06
date last changed
2010-05-12 14:30:02
@article{524475,
  abstract     = {In the present study, we tested three hypotheses that account for after-effects of response inhibition and goal shifting: the goal-shifting hypothesis, the reaction time (RT) adjustment hypothesis, and the stimulus-goal association hypothesis. To distinguish between the hypotheses, we examined performance in the stop-change paradigm and the dual-task paradigm. In the stop-change paradigm, we found that responding on no-signal trials slowed down when a stop-change signal was presented on the previous trial. Similarly, in the dual-task paradigm, we found that responding on no-signal trials slowed down when a dual-task signal was presented on the previous trial. However, aftereffects of unsuccessful inhibition or dual-task performance were observed only when the stimulus of the previous trial was repeated. These results are consistent with stimulus-goal association hypothesis, which assumes that the stimulus is associated with the different task goals on signal trials; when the stimulus is repeated, the tasks goal are retrieved, and interference occurs.},
  author       = {Verbruggen, Frederick and Logan, Gordon D.},
  issn         = {1747-0218},
  journal      = {Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1151--1159},
  publisher    = {Psychology Press},
  title        = {After-effects of goal shifting and response inhibition: A comparison of the stop-change and dual-task paradigms},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470210801994971},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Verbruggen, Frederick, and Gordon D. Logan. 2008. “After-effects of Goal Shifting and Response Inhibition: A Comparison of the Stop-change and Dual-task Paradigms.” Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (8): 1151–1159.
APA
Verbruggen, F., & Logan, G. D. (2008). After-effects of goal shifting and response inhibition: A comparison of the stop-change and dual-task paradigms. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 61(8), 1151–1159.
Vancouver
1.
Verbruggen F, Logan GD. After-effects of goal shifting and response inhibition: A comparison of the stop-change and dual-task paradigms. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Washington, UNITED STATES: Psychology Press; 2008;61(8):1151–9.
MLA
Verbruggen, Frederick, and Gordon D. Logan. “After-effects of Goal Shifting and Response Inhibition: A Comparison of the Stop-change and Dual-task Paradigms.” Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 61.8 (2008): 1151–1159. Print.