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Does bilingualism change native-language reading? Cognate effects in a sentence context

Eva Van Assche UGent, Wouter Duyck UGent, Robert Hartsuiker UGent and Kevin Diependaele UGent (2009) PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 20(8). p.923-927
abstract
Becoming a bilingual can change a person’s cognitive functioning and language processing in a number of ways. This study focused on how knowledge of a second language (L2) influences native-language (L1) sentence reading. We used the cognate facilitation effect as a marker of cross-lingual activations in both languages. Cognates (e.g., Dutch-English schip [ship]) and controls were presented in a sentence context, while eye movements were monitored. Results showed faster reading times for cognates than for controls. Thus, this study shows that one of our most automated skills, reading in our native language, is changed by the knowledge of a second language.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
VISUAL WORD RECOGNITION, TRANSLATION, LEXICAL ACCESS, ACTIVATION, L2
journal title
PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE
Psychol. sci.
volume
20
issue
8
pages
923 - 927
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000268713200001
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
5.09 (2009)
JCR rank
6/111 (2009)
JCR quartile
1 (2009)
ISSN
0956-7976
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
481611
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-481611
date created
2009-02-05 22:29:44
date last changed
2013-04-24 15:48:37
@article{481611,
  abstract     = {Becoming a bilingual can change a person{\textquoteright}s cognitive functioning and language processing in a number of ways. This study focused on how knowledge of a second language (L2) influences native-language (L1) sentence reading. We used the cognate facilitation effect as a marker of cross-lingual activations in both languages. Cognates (e.g., Dutch-English schip [ship]) and controls were presented in a sentence context, 
while eye movements were monitored. Results showed faster reading times for cognates than for controls. Thus, this study shows that one of our most automated skills, reading in our native language, is changed by the knowledge of a second language.},
  author       = {Van Assche, Eva and Duyck, Wouter and Hartsuiker, Robert and Diependaele, Kevin},
  issn         = {0956-7976},
  journal      = {PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {VISUAL WORD RECOGNITION,TRANSLATION,LEXICAL ACCESS,ACTIVATION,L2},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {923--927},
  title        = {Does bilingualism change native-language reading? Cognate effects in a sentence context},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Van Assche, Eva, Wouter Duyck, Robert Hartsuiker, and Kevin Diependaele. 2009. “Does Bilingualism Change Native-language Reading? Cognate Effects in a Sentence Context.” Psychological Science 20 (8): 923–927.
APA
Van Assche, E., Duyck, W., Hartsuiker, R., & Diependaele, K. (2009). Does bilingualism change native-language reading? Cognate effects in a sentence context. PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE, 20(8), 923–927.
Vancouver
1.
Van Assche E, Duyck W, Hartsuiker R, Diependaele K. Does bilingualism change native-language reading? Cognate effects in a sentence context. PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 2009;20(8):923–7.
MLA
Van Assche, Eva, Wouter Duyck, Robert Hartsuiker, et al. “Does Bilingualism Change Native-language Reading? Cognate Effects in a Sentence Context.” PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE 20.8 (2009): 923–927. Print.