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Aryl hydrocarbon bioaccessibility to small mammals from Arctic plants using in vitro techniques

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Abstract
Through their diet, herbivores inhabiting contaminated sites may be chronically exposed to a variety of aryl hydrocarbons (e.g., dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]). However, little is known about how differences in morphology and physiology among plant species alter the environmental accumulation of aryl hydrocarbons or their release and subsequent activity in the gastrointestinal tract of herbivores after ingestion. In the present study, the activity of aryl hydrocarbons during digestion was examined using six Arctic plant species growing in impacted and reference sites near Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada. The plant species studied were black spruce (Picea mariana), labrador tea (Ledum groenlandicum), bog birch (Betula glandulosa), green alder (Alnus crispa), water sedge (Carex aquatilis), and little-tree willow (Salix arbusculoides). Plants were digested using a simulator of the upper digestive tract, and aryl hydrocarbon release was evaluated using an aryl hydrocarbon-receptor assay. Bioaccessible aryl hydrocarbon activity varied among the plant species tested. The species with the greatest activity was green alder, and the species with the least activity was black spruce. Further investigation revealed that digested plant extracts may antagonize the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and prevent bioactivation of the aryl compound benzo[a]pyrene. Thus, PAH risk from the ingestion of vegetation varies among plant species and may depend on antagonists present in the vegetation.
Keywords
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, CONTAMINANTS, bioaccessibility, digestion simulation, aryl hydrocarbon assay, Arctic vegetation, POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS, INTESTINAL MICROBIAL ECOSYSTEM, VEGETATION, RECEPTOR, INDUCTION, NEEDLES, REACTOR, LIPIDS

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Chicago
Armstrong, Sarah A, Tom Van de Wiele, James J Germida, and Steven Siciliano. 2007. “Aryl Hydrocarbon Bioaccessibility to Small Mammals from Arctic Plants Using in Vitro Techniques.” Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 26 (3): 491–496.
APA
Armstrong, S. A., Van de Wiele, T., Germida, J. J., & Siciliano, S. (2007). Aryl hydrocarbon bioaccessibility to small mammals from Arctic plants using in vitro techniques. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY, 26(3), 491–496.
Vancouver
1.
Armstrong SA, Van de Wiele T, Germida JJ, Siciliano S. Aryl hydrocarbon bioaccessibility to small mammals from Arctic plants using in vitro techniques. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY. 2007;26(3):491–6.
MLA
Armstrong, Sarah A, Tom Van de Wiele, James J Germida, et al. “Aryl Hydrocarbon Bioaccessibility to Small Mammals from Arctic Plants Using in Vitro Techniques.” ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY 26.3 (2007): 491–496. Print.
@article{445166,
  abstract     = {Through their diet, herbivores inhabiting contaminated sites may be chronically exposed to a variety of aryl hydrocarbons (e.g., dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]). However, little is known about how differences in morphology and physiology among plant species alter the environmental accumulation of aryl hydrocarbons or their release and subsequent activity in the gastrointestinal tract of herbivores after ingestion. In the present study, the activity of aryl hydrocarbons during digestion was examined using six Arctic plant species growing in impacted and reference sites near Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada. The plant species studied were black spruce (Picea mariana), labrador tea (Ledum groenlandicum), bog birch (Betula glandulosa), green alder (Alnus crispa), water sedge (Carex aquatilis), and little-tree willow (Salix arbusculoides). Plants were digested using a simulator of the upper digestive tract, and aryl hydrocarbon release was evaluated using an aryl hydrocarbon-receptor assay. Bioaccessible aryl hydrocarbon activity varied among the plant species tested. The species with the greatest activity was green alder, and the species with the least activity was black spruce. Further investigation revealed that digested plant extracts may antagonize the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and prevent bioactivation of the aryl compound benzo[a]pyrene. Thus, PAH risk from the ingestion of vegetation varies among plant species and may depend on antagonists present in the vegetation.},
  author       = {Armstrong, Sarah A and Van de Wiele, Tom and Germida, James J and Siciliano, Steven},
  issn         = {0730-7268},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY},
  keywords     = {polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons,CONTAMINANTS,bioaccessibility,digestion simulation,aryl hydrocarbon assay,Arctic vegetation,POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS,INTESTINAL MICROBIAL ECOSYSTEM,VEGETATION,RECEPTOR,INDUCTION,NEEDLES,REACTOR,LIPIDS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {491--496},
  title        = {Aryl hydrocarbon bioaccessibility to small mammals from Arctic plants using in vitro techniques},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1897/06-226R1.1},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2007},
}

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