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Youth involvement in politically motivated violence: why do social integration, perceived legitimacy, and perceived discrimination matter?

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Abstract
Several major theories of crime causation have been applied to the study of violence towards persons and towards property (vandalism). Less frequently, these middle-range theoretical frameworks are applied to explain individual differences in political violence. Against a background of growing concern about right-wing political violence among adolescents, the present study examines the role of a number of independent variables derived from different theoretical frameworks in a sample of 2,879 Flemish adolescents. Using blockwise regression models, the independent effects of key independent variables from social control theory, procedural justice theory, general strain theory, social learning theory, and self-control theory are assessed. The results support an integrative approach towards the explanation of political violence. The implications of our findings for future studies on violent extremism are discussed. .
Keywords
SELF-CONTROL, CRIME, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, RISK, RADICALIZATION, PSYCHOLOGY, TERRORISM, PATHWAYS, DELINQUENT-BEHAVIOR, RACIAL-DISCRIMINATION

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Pauwels, Lieven, and Maarten De Waele. 2014. “Youth Involvement in Politically Motivated Violence: Why Do Social Integration, Perceived Legitimacy, and Perceived Discrimination Matter?” International Journal of Conflict and Violence 8 (1): 135–153.
APA
Pauwels, Lieven, & De Waele, M. (2014). Youth involvement in politically motivated violence: why do social integration, perceived legitimacy, and perceived discrimination matter? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE, 8(1), 135–153.
Vancouver
1.
Pauwels L, De Waele M. Youth involvement in politically motivated violence: why do social integration, perceived legitimacy, and perceived discrimination matter? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE. 2014;8(1):135–53.
MLA
Pauwels, Lieven, and Maarten De Waele. “Youth Involvement in Politically Motivated Violence: Why Do Social Integration, Perceived Legitimacy, and Perceived Discrimination Matter?” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE 8.1 (2014): 135–153. Print.
@article{4442212,
  abstract     = {Several major theories of crime causation have been applied to the study of violence towards persons and towards property (vandalism). Less frequently, these middle-range theoretical frameworks are applied to explain individual differences in political violence. Against a background of growing concern about right-wing political violence among adolescents, the present study examines the role of a number of independent variables derived from different theoretical frameworks in a sample of 2,879 Flemish adolescents. Using blockwise regression models, the independent effects of key independent variables from social control theory, procedural justice theory, general strain theory, social learning theory, and self-control theory are assessed. The results support an integrative approach towards the explanation of political violence. The implications of our findings for future studies on violent extremism are discussed. .},
  author       = {Pauwels, Lieven and De Waele, Maarten},
  issn         = {1864-1385},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE},
  keyword      = {SELF-CONTROL,CRIME,PROTECTIVE FACTORS,RISK,RADICALIZATION,PSYCHOLOGY,TERRORISM,PATHWAYS,DELINQUENT-BEHAVIOR,RACIAL-DISCRIMINATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {135--153},
  title        = {Youth involvement in politically motivated violence: why do social integration, perceived legitimacy, and perceived discrimination matter?},
  url          = {http://ijcv.uni-bielefeld.de/index.php/ijcv/issue/view/16},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2014},
}

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