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Public and private mechanisms of life extension in Caenorhabditis elegans

Koen Houthoofd UGent and Jacques Vanfleteren UGent (2007) MOLECULAR GENETICS AND GENOMICS. 277(6). p.601-617
abstract
Model organisms have been widely used to study the ageing phenomenon in order to learn about human ageing. Although the phylogenetic diversity between vertebrates and some of the most commonly used model systems could hardly be greater, several mechanisms of life extension are public (common characteristic in divergent species) and likely share a common ancestry. Dietary restriction, reduced IGF-signaling and, seemingly, reduced ROS-induced damage are the best known mechanisms for extending longevity in a variety of organisms. In this review, we summarize the knowledge of ageing in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and compare the mechanisms of life extension with knowledge from other model organisms.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
FREE-LIVING NEMATODE, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE/CATALASE MIMETICS, INSULIN-RECEPTOR SUBSTRATE, ACTIVATED PROTEIN-KINASE, LONG-LIVED MUTANTS, HEAT-SHOCK FACTOR, DAUER-INDUCING PHEROMONE, SYSTEMATIC RNAI SCREEN, AGE-RELATED ALTERATION, OLD TURBATRIX-ACETI, ageing, C. elegans, longevity, Ins/IGF-1 signaling, dietary restriction, mitochondria, review
journal title
MOLECULAR GENETICS AND GENOMICS
Mol. Genet. Genomics
volume
277
issue
6
pages
601 - 617
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000246614500001
JCR category
BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.978 (2007)
JCR rank
109/260 (2007)
JCR quartile
2 (2007)
ISSN
1617-4615
DOI
10.1007/s00438-007-0225-1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
443595
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-443595
date created
2008-11-26 07:47:00
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:07:01
@article{443595,
  abstract     = {Model organisms have been widely used to study the ageing phenomenon in order to learn about human ageing. Although the phylogenetic diversity between vertebrates and some of the most commonly used model systems could hardly be greater, several mechanisms of life extension are public (common characteristic in divergent species) and likely share a common ancestry. Dietary restriction, reduced IGF-signaling and, seemingly, reduced ROS-induced damage are the best known mechanisms for extending longevity in a variety of organisms. In this review, we summarize the knowledge of ageing in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and compare the mechanisms of life extension with knowledge from other model organisms.},
  author       = {Houthoofd, Koen and Vanfleteren, Jacques},
  issn         = {1617-4615},
  journal      = {MOLECULAR GENETICS AND GENOMICS},
  keyword      = {FREE-LIVING NEMATODE,SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE/CATALASE MIMETICS,INSULIN-RECEPTOR SUBSTRATE,ACTIVATED PROTEIN-KINASE,LONG-LIVED MUTANTS,HEAT-SHOCK FACTOR,DAUER-INDUCING PHEROMONE,SYSTEMATIC RNAI SCREEN,AGE-RELATED ALTERATION,OLD TURBATRIX-ACETI,ageing,C. elegans,longevity,Ins/IGF-1 signaling,dietary restriction,mitochondria,review},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {601--617},
  title        = {Public and private mechanisms of life extension in Caenorhabditis elegans},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00438-007-0225-1},
  volume       = {277},
  year         = {2007},
}

Chicago
Houthoofd, Koen, and Jacques Vanfleteren. 2007. “Public and Private Mechanisms of Life Extension in Caenorhabditis Elegans.” Molecular Genetics and Genomics 277 (6): 601–617.
APA
Houthoofd, K., & Vanfleteren, J. (2007). Public and private mechanisms of life extension in Caenorhabditis elegans. MOLECULAR GENETICS AND GENOMICS, 277(6), 601–617.
Vancouver
1.
Houthoofd K, Vanfleteren J. Public and private mechanisms of life extension in Caenorhabditis elegans. MOLECULAR GENETICS AND GENOMICS. 2007;277(6):601–17.
MLA
Houthoofd, Koen, and Jacques Vanfleteren. “Public and Private Mechanisms of Life Extension in Caenorhabditis Elegans.” MOLECULAR GENETICS AND GENOMICS 277.6 (2007): 601–617. Print.