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The HMI™ module: a new tool to study the host-microbiota interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro

Massimo Marzorati UGent, Barbara Vanhoecke, Tine De Ryck, Mehdi Sadaghian Sadabad, Iris Pinheiro UGent, Sam Possemiers, Pieter Van den Abbeele, Lara Derycke UGent, Marc Bracke UGent, Jan Pieters UGent, et al. (2014) BMC MICROBIOLOGY. 14.
abstract
Background: Recent scientific developments have shed more light on the importance of the host-microbe interaction, particularly in the gut. However, the mechanistic study of the host-microbe interplay is complicated by the intrinsic limitations in reaching the different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in vivo. In this paper, we present the technical validation of a new device - the Host-Microbiota Interaction (HMI) module - and the evidence that it can be used in combination with a gut dynamic simulator to evaluate the effect of a specific treatment at the level of the luminal microbial community and of the host surface colonization and signaling. Results: The HMI module recreates conditions that are physiologically relevant for the GIT: i) a mucosal area to which bacteria can adhere under relevant shear stress (3 dynes cm-2); ii) the bilateral transport of low molecular weight metabolites (4 to 150 kDa) with permeation coefficients ranging from 2.4 x 10(-6) to 7.1 x 10(-9) cm sec(-1); and iii) microaerophilic conditions at the bottom of the growing biofilm (PmO2 = 2.5 x 10(-4) cm sec(-1)). In a long-term study, the host's cells in the HMI module were still viable after a 48-hour exposure to a complex microbial community. The dominant mucus-associated microbiota differed from the luminal one and its composition was influenced by the treatment with a dried product derived from yeast fermentation. The latter - with known anti-inflammatory properties induced a decrease of pro-inflammatory IL-8 production between 24 and 48 h. Conclusions: The study of the in vivo functionality of adhering bacterial communities in the human GIT and of the localized effect on the host is frequently hindered by the complexity of reaching particular areas of the GIT. The HMI module offers the possibility of co-culturing a gut representative microbial community with enterocyte-like cells up to 48 h and may therefore contribute to the mechanistic understanding of host-microbiome interactions.
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author
organization
alternative title
The HMI (TM) module : a new tool to study the host-microbiota interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Enterocytes, Bacterial adhesion, Shear stress, SHIME (R), LACTOBACILLUS-RHAMNOSUS GG, DYNAMIC GUT MODEL, COLONIC FERMENTATION, BIOFILM COMMUNITIES, FECAL MICROBIOTA, GENE-EXPRESSION, LARGE-INTESTINE, CACO-2 CELLS, SHEAR-STRESS, MUCUS GEL
journal title
BMC MICROBIOLOGY
BMC Microbiol.
volume
14
article number
133
pages
14 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000336680300001
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.729 (2014)
JCR rank
51/119 (2014)
JCR quartile
2 (2014)
ISSN
1471-2180
DOI
10.1186/1471-2180-14-133
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
4431125
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4431125
date created
2014-06-27 10:14:57
date last changed
2017-06-14 09:34:47
@article{4431125,
  abstract     = {Background: Recent scientific developments have shed more light on the importance of the host-microbe interaction, particularly in the gut. However, the mechanistic study of the host-microbe interplay is complicated by the intrinsic limitations in reaching the different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in vivo. In this paper, we present the technical validation of a new device - the Host-Microbiota Interaction (HMI) module - and the evidence that it can be used in combination with a gut dynamic simulator to evaluate the effect of a specific treatment at the level of the luminal microbial community and of the host surface colonization and signaling.
Results: The HMI module recreates conditions that are physiologically relevant for the GIT: i) a mucosal area to which bacteria can adhere under relevant shear stress (3 dynes cm-2); ii) the bilateral transport of low molecular weight metabolites (4 to 150 kDa) with permeation coefficients ranging from 2.4 x 10(-6) to 7.1 x 10(-9) cm sec(-1); and iii) microaerophilic conditions at the bottom of the growing biofilm (PmO2 = 2.5 x 10(-4) cm sec(-1)). In a long-term study, the host's cells in the HMI module were still viable after a 48-hour exposure to a complex microbial community. The dominant mucus-associated microbiota differed from the luminal one and its composition was influenced by the treatment with a dried product derived from yeast fermentation. The latter - with known anti-inflammatory properties induced a decrease of pro-inflammatory IL-8 production between 24 and 48 h.
Conclusions: The study of the in vivo functionality of adhering bacterial communities in the human GIT and of the localized effect on the host is frequently hindered by the complexity of reaching particular areas of the GIT. The HMI module offers the possibility of co-culturing a gut representative microbial community with enterocyte-like cells up to 48 h and may therefore contribute to the mechanistic understanding of host-microbiome interactions.},
  articleno    = {133},
  author       = {Marzorati, Massimo and Vanhoecke, Barbara and De Ryck, Tine and  Sadaghian Sadabad, Mehdi and Pinheiro, Iris and Possemiers, Sam and Van den Abbeele, Pieter and Derycke, Lara and Bracke, Marc and Pieters, Jan and Hennebel, Tom and Harmsen, Hermie and Verstraete, Willy and Van De Wiele, Tom},
  issn         = {1471-2180},
  journal      = {BMC MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Enterocytes,Bacterial adhesion,Shear stress,SHIME (R),LACTOBACILLUS-RHAMNOSUS GG,DYNAMIC GUT MODEL,COLONIC FERMENTATION,BIOFILM COMMUNITIES,FECAL MICROBIOTA,GENE-EXPRESSION,LARGE-INTESTINE,CACO-2 CELLS,SHEAR-STRESS,MUCUS GEL},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {14},
  title        = {The HMI{\texttrademark} module: a new tool to study the host-microbiota interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2180-14-133},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Marzorati, Massimo, Barbara Vanhoecke, Tine De Ryck, Mehdi Sadaghian Sadabad, Iris Pinheiro, Sam Possemiers, Pieter Van den Abbeele, et al. 2014. “The HMITM Module: a New Tool to Study the Host-microbiota Interaction in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract in Vitro.” Bmc Microbiology 14.
APA
Marzorati, M., Vanhoecke, B., De Ryck, T., Sadaghian Sadabad, M., Pinheiro, I., Possemiers, S., Van den Abbeele, P., et al. (2014). The HMITM module: a new tool to study the host-microbiota interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. BMC MICROBIOLOGY, 14.
Vancouver
1.
Marzorati M, Vanhoecke B, De Ryck T, Sadaghian Sadabad M, Pinheiro I, Possemiers S, et al. The HMITM module: a new tool to study the host-microbiota interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. BMC MICROBIOLOGY. 2014;14.
MLA
Marzorati, Massimo, Barbara Vanhoecke, Tine De Ryck, et al. “The HMITM Module: a New Tool to Study the Host-microbiota Interaction in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract in Vitro.” BMC MICROBIOLOGY 14 (2014): n. pag. Print.