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Crosstalk between mammalian cells and the microbiome through quorum sensing peptides, influencing cancer metastasis

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Abstract
To date, the precise role of the human microbiome in health and disease remains largely unknown. Research mainly focused on the effect of toxins or DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced by commensal or pathogenic bacteria, on inflammation or carcinogenesis.[1,2] In this study however, we demonstrate that quorum sensing peptides, secreted by intestinal bacteria, can also influence cancer cell behaviour: Phr0662 (Bacillus sp., ERNNT), EntF-metabolite (Enterococcus faecium, SNLVECVFSLFKKCN) and EDF-derived (Escherichia coli, NWN) peptides initiate tumour cell invasion and migration through epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT)-like transition as well as promote angiogenesis. Transcriptome profiling after peptide treatment of the HCT-8/E11 cells confirmed their tumour-promoting properties by up- or downregulation of different microRNAs (e.g. miR-664a and miR-222) and other genes (e.g. CXorf61 and Histone cluster 1 H4).[3] Our results indicate that the human microbiome, through their quorum sensing peptides, is one of the factors responsible for tumorigenesis. These findings may offer new prospects in cancer prevention and therapy.
Keywords
colon cancer, metastasis, Microbiome, quorum sensing peptides

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MLA
Wynendaele, Evelien et al. “Crosstalk Between Mammalian Cells and the Microbiome Through Quorum Sensing Peptides, Influencing Cancer Metastasis.” Bioactive Peptides, 14th Naples Workshop, Abstracts. 2014. Print.
APA
Wynendaele, E., Verbeke, F., D’Hondt, M., Hendrix, A., Van De Wiele, C., Burvenich, C., Peremans, K., et al. (2014). Crosstalk between mammalian cells and the microbiome through quorum sensing peptides, influencing cancer metastasis. Bioactive Peptides, 14th Naples workshop, Abstracts. Presented at the 14th Naples workshop on Bioactive Peptides.
Chicago author-date
Wynendaele, Evelien, Frederick Verbeke, Matthias D’Hondt, An Hendrix, Christophe Van De Wiele, Christian Burvenich, Kathelijne Peremans, Olivier De Wever, Marc Bracke, and Bart De Spiegeleer. 2014. “Crosstalk Between Mammalian Cells and the Microbiome Through Quorum Sensing Peptides, Influencing Cancer Metastasis.” In Bioactive Peptides, 14th Naples Workshop, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Wynendaele, Evelien, Frederick Verbeke, Matthias D’Hondt, An Hendrix, Christophe Van De Wiele, Christian Burvenich, Kathelijne Peremans, Olivier De Wever, Marc Bracke, and Bart De Spiegeleer. 2014. “Crosstalk Between Mammalian Cells and the Microbiome Through Quorum Sensing Peptides, Influencing Cancer Metastasis.” In Bioactive Peptides, 14th Naples Workshop, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
Wynendaele E, Verbeke F, D’Hondt M, Hendrix A, Van De Wiele C, Burvenich C, et al. Crosstalk between mammalian cells and the microbiome through quorum sensing peptides, influencing cancer metastasis. Bioactive Peptides, 14th Naples workshop, Abstracts. 2014.
IEEE
[1]
E. Wynendaele et al., “Crosstalk between mammalian cells and the microbiome through quorum sensing peptides, influencing cancer metastasis,” in Bioactive Peptides, 14th Naples workshop, Abstracts, Naples, Italy, 2014.
@inproceedings{4429327,
  abstract     = {To date, the precise role of the human microbiome in health and disease remains largely unknown. Research mainly focused on the effect of toxins or DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced by commensal or pathogenic bacteria, on inflammation or carcinogenesis.[1,2] In this study however, we demonstrate that quorum sensing peptides, secreted by intestinal bacteria, can also influence cancer cell behaviour: Phr0662 (Bacillus sp., ERNNT), EntF-metabolite (Enterococcus faecium, SNLVECVFSLFKKCN) and EDF-derived (Escherichia coli, NWN) peptides initiate tumour cell invasion and migration through epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT)-like transition as well as promote angiogenesis. Transcriptome profiling after peptide treatment of the HCT-8/E11 cells confirmed their tumour-promoting properties by up- or downregulation of different microRNAs (e.g. miR-664a and miR-222) and other genes (e.g. CXorf61 and Histone cluster 1 H4).[3] Our results indicate that the human microbiome, through their quorum sensing peptides, is one of the factors responsible for tumorigenesis. These findings may offer new prospects in cancer prevention and therapy.},
  author       = {Wynendaele, Evelien and Verbeke, Frederick and D'Hondt, Matthias and Hendrix, An and Van De Wiele, Christophe and Burvenich, Christian and Peremans, Kathelijne and De Wever, Olivier and Bracke, Marc and De Spiegeleer, Bart},
  booktitle    = {Bioactive Peptides, 14th Naples workshop, Abstracts},
  keywords     = {colon cancer,metastasis,Microbiome,quorum sensing peptides},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Naples, Italy},
  title        = {Crosstalk between mammalian cells and the microbiome through quorum sensing peptides, influencing cancer metastasis},
  year         = {2014},
}