Advanced search
1 file | 1.06 MB Add to list

Engineering the specificity of trehalose phosphorylase as a general strategy for the production of glycosyl phosphates

Chao Chen (UGent) , Jef Van der Borght (UGent) , Rob De Vreese (UGent) , Matthias D'hooghe (UGent) , Wim Soetaert (UGent) and Tom Desmet (UGent)
(2014) CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS. 50(58). p.7834-7836
Author
Organization
Project
Biotechnology for a sustainable economy (Bio-Economy)
Abstract
A two-step process is reported for the anomeric phosphorylation of galactose, using trehalose phosphorylase as biocatalyst. The monosaccharide enters this process as acceptor but can subsequently be released from the donor side, thanks to the non-reducing nature of the disaccharide intermediate. A key development was the creation of an optimized enzyme variant that displays a strict specificity (99%) for beta-galactose 1-phosphate as product.
Keywords
DIRECTED EVOLUTION, SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY, DISACCHARIDE PHOSPHORYLASES, SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE, ENZYMATIC PRODUCTION, GALACTOKINASE, REGENERATION, STABILITY, MECHANISM, ANALOGS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.06 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Chen, Chao, Jef Van der Borght, Rob De Vreese, et al. “Engineering the Specificity of Trehalose Phosphorylase as a General Strategy for the Production of Glycosyl Phosphates.” CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS 50.58 (2014): 7834–7836. Print.
APA
Chen, Chao, Van der Borght, J., De Vreese, R., D’hooghe, M., Soetaert, W., & Desmet, T. (2014). Engineering the specificity of trehalose phosphorylase as a general strategy for the production of glycosyl phosphates. CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 50(58), 7834–7836.
Chicago author-date
Chen, Chao, Jef Van der Borght, Rob De Vreese, Matthias D’hooghe, Wim Soetaert, and Tom Desmet. 2014. “Engineering the Specificity of Trehalose Phosphorylase as a General Strategy for the Production of Glycosyl Phosphates.” Chemical Communications 50 (58): 7834–7836.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Chen, Chao, Jef Van der Borght, Rob De Vreese, Matthias D’hooghe, Wim Soetaert, and Tom Desmet. 2014. “Engineering the Specificity of Trehalose Phosphorylase as a General Strategy for the Production of Glycosyl Phosphates.” Chemical Communications 50 (58): 7834–7836.
Vancouver
1.
Chen C, Van der Borght J, De Vreese R, D’hooghe M, Soetaert W, Desmet T. Engineering the specificity of trehalose phosphorylase as a general strategy for the production of glycosyl phosphates. CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS. 2014;50(58):7834–6.
IEEE
[1]
C. Chen, J. Van der Borght, R. De Vreese, M. D’hooghe, W. Soetaert, and T. Desmet, “Engineering the specificity of trehalose phosphorylase as a general strategy for the production of glycosyl phosphates,” CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, vol. 50, no. 58, pp. 7834–7836, 2014.
@article{4427715,
  abstract     = {A two-step process is reported for the anomeric phosphorylation of galactose, using trehalose phosphorylase as biocatalyst. The monosaccharide enters this process as acceptor but can subsequently be released from the donor side, thanks to the non-reducing nature of the disaccharide intermediate. A key development was the creation of an optimized enzyme variant that displays a strict specificity (99%) for beta-galactose 1-phosphate as product.},
  author       = {Chen, Chao and Van der Borght, Jef and De Vreese, Rob and D'hooghe, Matthias and Soetaert, Wim and Desmet, Tom},
  issn         = {1359-7345},
  journal      = {CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS},
  keywords     = {DIRECTED EVOLUTION,SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY,DISACCHARIDE PHOSPHORYLASES,SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE,ENZYMATIC PRODUCTION,GALACTOKINASE,REGENERATION,STABILITY,MECHANISM,ANALOGS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {58},
  pages        = {7834--7836},
  title        = {Engineering the specificity of trehalose phosphorylase as a general strategy for the production of glycosyl phosphates},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4cc02202e},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2014},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: