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Affective team climate: a multi-level analysis of psychosocial working conditions and psychological distress in team workers

Katia Levecque UGent, Henk Roose UGent, Christophe Vanroelen UGent and Ronan Van Rossem UGent (2014) ACTA SOCIOLOGICA. 57(2). p.153-166
abstract
In occupational health research, the demand-control-support (DCS) model has attracted a great deal of attention. Although this model emphasizes the interaction between workers and their work environment, the DCS framework has mainly been tested at the micro-level. The present study shows that combining the DCS model with insights from organizational climate studies offers a fruitful theoretical framework by which to address variation in psychological distress in team workers. Hierarchical logistic regression using data on 1,098 workers from 97 teams in a car factory in Belgium reveals that a positive perception of the affective climate in one's team lowers levels of psychological distress. In addition, the team's affective climate, emerging from and reproduced within everyday social interaction between team members, plays a significant role of its own in the well-being of team members. When the affective team climate is positive, all team members benefit in terms of distress levels, even those workers who hold a negative perception of their emotional work environment. Part of the health effects of a positive climate runs through moderating the health-damaging effects of high job demands.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
JOB DEMANDS, STRESS, RISK-FACTORS, MENTAL-HEALTH, GENERALIZED ANXIETY, INTERRATER AGREEMENT, DEMAND-CONTROL MODEL, CONTROL-SUPPORT-MODEL, occupational stress, psychological distress, organizational characteristics, affective team climate, multi-level analysis, PERCEPTIONS, DEPRESSION, demand-control-support model
journal title
ACTA SOCIOLOGICA
Acta Sociol.
volume
57
issue
2
pages
153 - 166
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000334028400004
ISSN
1502-3869
DOI
10.1177/0001699313498262
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4423210
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4423210
date created
2014-06-18 15:01:29
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:52
@article{4423210,
  abstract     = {In occupational health research, the demand-control-support (DCS) model has attracted a great deal of attention. Although this model emphasizes the interaction between workers and their work environment, the DCS framework has mainly been tested at the micro-level. The present study shows that combining the DCS model with insights from organizational climate studies offers a fruitful theoretical framework by which to address variation in psychological distress in team workers. Hierarchical logistic regression using data on 1,098 workers from 97 teams in a car factory in Belgium reveals that a positive perception of the affective climate in one's team lowers levels of psychological distress. In addition, the team's affective climate, emerging from and reproduced within everyday social interaction between team members, plays a significant role of its own in the well-being of team members. When the affective team climate is positive, all team members benefit in terms of distress levels, even those workers who hold a negative perception of their emotional work environment. Part of the health effects of a positive climate runs through moderating the health-damaging effects of high job demands.},
  author       = {Levecque, Katia and Roose, Henk and Vanroelen, Christophe and Van Rossem, Ronan},
  issn         = {1502-3869},
  journal      = {ACTA SOCIOLOGICA},
  keyword      = {JOB DEMANDS,STRESS,RISK-FACTORS,MENTAL-HEALTH,GENERALIZED ANXIETY,INTERRATER AGREEMENT,DEMAND-CONTROL MODEL,CONTROL-SUPPORT-MODEL,occupational stress,psychological distress,organizational characteristics,affective team climate,multi-level analysis,PERCEPTIONS,DEPRESSION,demand-control-support model},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {153--166},
  title        = {Affective team climate: a multi-level analysis of psychosocial working conditions and psychological distress in team workers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0001699313498262},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Levecque, Katia, Henk Roose, Christophe Vanroelen, and Ronan Van Rossem. 2014. “Affective Team Climate: a Multi-level Analysis of Psychosocial Working Conditions and Psychological Distress in Team Workers.” Acta Sociologica 57 (2): 153–166.
APA
Levecque, K., Roose, H., Vanroelen, C., & Van Rossem, R. (2014). Affective team climate: a multi-level analysis of psychosocial working conditions and psychological distress in team workers. ACTA SOCIOLOGICA, 57(2), 153–166.
Vancouver
1.
Levecque K, Roose H, Vanroelen C, Van Rossem R. Affective team climate: a multi-level analysis of psychosocial working conditions and psychological distress in team workers. ACTA SOCIOLOGICA. 2014;57(2):153–66.
MLA
Levecque, Katia, Henk Roose, Christophe Vanroelen, et al. “Affective Team Climate: a Multi-level Analysis of Psychosocial Working Conditions and Psychological Distress in Team Workers.” ACTA SOCIOLOGICA 57.2 (2014): 153–166. Print.