Advanced search
1 file | 1.17 MB Add to list

Sixty-four or four-and-sixty? The influence of language and working memory on children's number transcoding

Author
Organization
Project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
Abstract
Number transcoding (e.g., writing 64 when hearing “sixty-four”) is a basic numerical skill; rather faultlessly performed in adults, but difficult for children. In the present study, children speaking Dutch (an inversed number language) and French (a non-inversed number language) wrote Arabic digits to dictation. We also tested their IQ and their phonological, visuospatial, and executive working memory. Although the number of transcoding errors (e.g., hearing 46 but writing 56) was equal in both groups, the number of inversion errors (e.g., hearing 46 but writing 64) was significantly higher in Dutch-speaking than in French-speaking children. Regression analyses confirmed that language was the only significant predictor of inversion errors. Working-memory components, in contrast, were the only significant predictors of transcoding errors. Executive resources were important in all children. Less-skilled transcoders also differed from more-skilled transcoders in that they used semantic rather than asemantic transcoding routes. Given the observed relation between number transcoding and mathematics grades, current findings may provide useful information for educational and clinical settings.
Keywords
NUMERALS, CAPACITY, PERFORMANCE, MODEL, COGNITIVE MECHANISMS, DEVELOPMENTAL DYSCALCULIA, place-value understanding, transcoding errors, inversion errors, number transcoding, number language, working memory

Downloads

  • fpsyg-05-00313.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.17 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Imbo, Ineke et al. “Sixty-four or Four-and-sixty? The Influence of Language and Working Memory on Children’s Number Transcoding.” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY 5 (2014): n. pag. Print.
APA
Imbo, I., Vanden Bulcke, C., De Brauwer, J., & Fias, W. (2014). Sixty-four or four-and-sixty? The influence of language and working memory on children’s number transcoding. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 5.
Chicago author-date
Imbo, Ineke, Charlotte Vanden Bulcke, Jolien De Brauwer, and Wim Fias. 2014. “Sixty-four or Four-and-sixty? The Influence of Language and Working Memory on Children’s Number Transcoding.” Frontiers in Psychology 5.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Imbo, Ineke, Charlotte Vanden Bulcke, Jolien De Brauwer, and Wim Fias. 2014. “Sixty-four or Four-and-sixty? The Influence of Language and Working Memory on Children’s Number Transcoding.” Frontiers in Psychology 5.
Vancouver
1.
Imbo I, Vanden Bulcke C, De Brauwer J, Fias W. Sixty-four or four-and-sixty? The influence of language and working memory on children’s number transcoding. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 2014;5.
IEEE
[1]
I. Imbo, C. Vanden Bulcke, J. De Brauwer, and W. Fias, “Sixty-four or four-and-sixty? The influence of language and working memory on children’s number transcoding,” FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 5, 2014.
@article{4420189,
  abstract     = {Number transcoding (e.g., writing 64 when hearing “sixty-four”) is a basic numerical skill; rather faultlessly performed in adults, but difficult for children. In the present study, children speaking Dutch (an inversed number language) and French (a non-inversed number language) wrote Arabic digits to dictation. We also tested their IQ and their phonological, visuospatial, and executive working memory. Although the number of transcoding errors (e.g., hearing 46 but writing 56) was equal in both groups, the number of inversion errors (e.g., hearing 46 but writing 64) was significantly higher in Dutch-speaking than in French-speaking children. Regression analyses confirmed that language was the only significant predictor of inversion errors. Working-memory components, in contrast, were the only significant predictors of transcoding errors. Executive resources were important in all children. Less-skilled transcoders also differed from more-skilled transcoders in that they used semantic rather than asemantic transcoding routes. Given the observed relation between number transcoding and mathematics grades, current findings may provide useful information for educational and clinical settings.},
  author       = {Imbo, Ineke and Vanden Bulcke, Charlotte and De Brauwer, Jolien and Fias, Wim},
  issn         = {1664-1078},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {NUMERALS,CAPACITY,PERFORMANCE,MODEL,COGNITIVE MECHANISMS,DEVELOPMENTAL DYSCALCULIA,place-value understanding,transcoding errors,inversion errors,number transcoding,number language,working memory},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {Sixty-four or four-and-sixty? The influence of language and working memory on children's number transcoding},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00313},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2014},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: