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Poverty and decision-making in child welfare and protection: deepening the bias-need debate

Lieve Bradt (UGent) , Griet Roets (UGent) , Rudi Roose (UGent) , Yves Rosseel (UGent) and Maria De Bie (UGent)
(2015) BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK. 45(7). p.2161-2175
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Abstract
The influence of socio-economic background factors, such as poverty, on the risk of children to be disproportionately represented and placed in residential care has increasingly been the subject of international research. This article reports on the findings of a research project that focused on the relationship between poverty and child welfare and protection (CWP) interventions in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium). Using logistic regression models (N = 33,423), we examined which specific socio-economic risk factors in the total population of children enhances the risk of CWP interventions. The results show that all included socio-economic variables, except one, show an increased risk of CWP interventions. The results also reveal that a rather dominant social, cultural and historically rooted construction of middle-class family life seems to be an important ground for interventions. Based on these findings, it is argued that the current debate on bias might mask implicit assumptions within CWP decision making.
Keywords
poverty, logistic regression, decision making, Child welfare and protection, SOCIAL-WORK, RACE

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Chicago
Bradt, Lieve, Griet Roets, Rudi Roose, Yves Rosseel, and Maria De Bie. 2015. “Poverty and Decision-making in Child Welfare and Protection: Deepening the Bias-need Debate.” British Journal of Social Work 45 (7): 2161–2175.
APA
Bradt, L., Roets, G., Roose, R., Rosseel, Y., & De Bie, M. (2015). Poverty and decision-making in child welfare and protection: deepening the bias-need debate. BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK, 45(7), 2161–2175.
Vancouver
1.
Bradt L, Roets G, Roose R, Rosseel Y, De Bie M. Poverty and decision-making in child welfare and protection: deepening the bias-need debate. BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK. 2015;45(7):2161–75.
MLA
Bradt, Lieve, Griet Roets, Rudi Roose, et al. “Poverty and Decision-making in Child Welfare and Protection: Deepening the Bias-need Debate.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK 45.7 (2015): 2161–2175. Print.
@article{4412771,
  abstract     = {The influence of socio-economic background factors, such as poverty, on the risk of children to be disproportionately represented and placed in residential care has increasingly been the subject of international research. This article reports on the findings of a research project that focused on the relationship between poverty and child welfare and protection (CWP) interventions in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium). Using logistic regression models (N = 33,423), we examined which specific socio-economic risk factors in the total population of children enhances the risk of CWP interventions. The results show that all included socio-economic variables, except one, show an increased risk of CWP interventions. The results also reveal that a rather dominant social, cultural and historically rooted construction of middle-class family life seems to be an important ground for interventions. Based on these findings, it is argued that the current debate on bias might mask implicit assumptions within CWP decision making.},
  author       = {Bradt, Lieve and Roets, Griet and Roose, Rudi and Rosseel, Yves and De Bie, Maria},
  issn         = {0045-3102},
  journal      = {BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {2161--2175},
  title        = {Poverty and decision-making in child welfare and protection: deepening the bias-need debate},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcu086},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2015},
}

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