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Is there less discrimination in occupations where recruitment is difficult?

Stijn Baert (UGent) , Bart Cockx (UGent) , Niels Gheyle (UGent) and Cora Vandamme
(2015) ILR REVIEW. 68(3). p.467-500
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Abstract
We empirically test the cross-sectional relationship between hiring discrimination and labor market tightness at the level of the occupation. To this end, we conduct a correspondence test in the youth labor market. In line with theoretical expectations, we find that, compared to natives, candidates with a foreign sounding name are equally often invited to a job interview if they apply for occupations for which vacancies are difficult to fill, but they have to send twice as many applications for occupations for which labor market tightness is low. Our findings are robust to various sensitivity checks.
Keywords
labor market tightness, field experiments, Hiring discrimination, ethnic discrimination, EQUILIBRIUM SEARCH MODEL, LABOR-MARKET, FIELD EXPERIMENT, ETHNIC DISCRIMINATION, DETECTING DISCRIMINATION, UNEMPLOYMENT, DURATION, SEX, IMPACT, GAPS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Baert, Stijn, Bart Cockx, Niels Gheyle, and Cora Vandamme. 2015. “Is There Less Discrimination in Occupations Where Recruitment Is Difficult?” Ilr Review 68 (3): 467–500.
APA
Baert, Stijn, Cockx, B., Gheyle, N., & Vandamme, C. (2015). Is there less discrimination in occupations where recruitment is difficult? ILR REVIEW, 68(3), 467–500.
Vancouver
1.
Baert S, Cockx B, Gheyle N, Vandamme C. Is there less discrimination in occupations where recruitment is difficult? ILR REVIEW. 2015;68(3):467–500.
MLA
Baert, Stijn, Bart Cockx, Niels Gheyle, et al. “Is There Less Discrimination in Occupations Where Recruitment Is Difficult?” ILR REVIEW 68.3 (2015): 467–500. Print.
@article{4392596,
  abstract     = {We empirically test the cross-sectional relationship between hiring discrimination and labor market tightness at the level of the occupation. To this end, we conduct a correspondence test in the youth labor market. In line with theoretical expectations, we find that, compared to natives, candidates with a foreign sounding name are equally often invited to a job interview if they apply for occupations for which vacancies are difficult to fill, but they have to send twice as many applications for occupations for which labor market tightness is low. Our findings are robust to various sensitivity checks.},
  author       = {Baert, Stijn and Cockx, Bart and Gheyle, Niels and Vandamme, Cora},
  issn         = {0019-7939},
  journal      = {ILR REVIEW},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {467--500},
  title        = {Is there less discrimination in occupations where recruitment is difficult?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0019793915570873},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2015},
}

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