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A disparate trace element metabolism in zebu (Bos indicus) and crossbred (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) cattle in response to a copper-deficient diet

Veronique Dermauw, Annelies De Cuyper UGent, Luc Duchateau UGent, Assen Waseyehon, Ellen Dierenfeld, Marcus Clauss UGent, Iain R Peters, Gijs Du Laing UGent and Geert Janssens UGent (2014) JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE. 92(7). p.3007-3017
abstract
Copper deficiency is a commonly diagnosed problem in cattle around the globe. In Jimma, Ethiopia, 8 zebu (Bos indicus) and 8 zebu x Holstein Friesian cross (Bos taurus x Bos indicus) heifers were used in an 11-wk study to investigate breed type differences and effects of Cu deficiency on concentrations of trace elements in plasma and edible tissues as well as mRNA expression of Cu-related genes. Heifers were fed a grass diet (6.4 +/- 0.2 [SEM] mg Cu/kg DM) supplemented with 1 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 1 to 4 and 2 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 5 to 11, with blood samples collected every 2 wk and tissue collection postmortem. Plasma, liver, kidney, and semitendinosus and cardiac muscle were analyzed for Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, Mo, Co, and Mn. Expression of mRNA Cu-related genes was measured in aorta (lysyl oxidase [LOX]), liver (Cu transporting beta-polypeptide [Atp7b], Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase [CCS], cytochrome c oxidase assembly homolog 17 [Cox17], Cu transporter 1 homolog [Ctr1], and superoxide dismutase 1 [Sod1]), and duodenum (diamine oxidase [DAO] and metallo-thionein-1A [Mt1a]) as well as the Se-related glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1). Zebu cattle maintained initial plasma Cu concentrations just below the threshold value for deficiency, whereas crossbred cattle gradually became severely Cu deficient over time (P < 0.001). In contrast, plasma Zn and Co were greater in zebu cattle at the onset of the trial but became similar to crossbred cattle towards the end of the trial (P < 0.001). Liver Cu (P = 0.002) and Fe (P <= 0.001), kidney Se (P < 0.001), and kidney and cardiac muscle Co (P <= 0.001) concentrations were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. Increased hepatic mRNA expression of the Cu regulatory genes Atp7b, Ctr1 (P = 0.02), CCS (P = 0.03), and Cox17 (P = 0.009) and Cu-related Sod1 (P = 0.001) as well as the Se-related Gpx1 (P <= 0.001) were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. However, duodenal mRNA expression of DAO (P = 0.8) and Mt1a (P = 0.2) and aortic expression of LOX (P = 0.8) were not different. Both the differences in Cu status indices (plasma and liver concentrations) and hepatic mRNA expression of Cu regulatory genes point to the possibility of a more efficient use of dietary Cu in B. indicus as compared to B. taurus x B. indicus cattle resulting in greater sensitivity to Cu deficiency in B. taurus crossbred cattle.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ETHIOPIA, AFRICA, ANGUS, EXCRETION, RUMINANTS, MOLYBDENUM, SHEEP, BREED, RIFT-VALLEY, deficiency, trace element, zebu, GLUTATHIONE-PEROXIDASE, copper, cattle, Bos indicus
journal title
JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE
J. Anim. Sci.
volume
92
issue
7
pages
3007 - 3017
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000338644000024
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
2.108 (2014)
JCR rank
5/57 (2014)
JCR quartile
1 (2014)
ISSN
0021-8812
DOI
10.2527/jas.2013-6979
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4390353
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4390353
date created
2014-05-22 09:33:06
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:41
@article{4390353,
  abstract     = {Copper deficiency is a commonly diagnosed problem in cattle around the globe. In Jimma, Ethiopia, 8 zebu (Bos indicus) and 8 zebu x Holstein Friesian cross (Bos taurus x Bos indicus) heifers were used in an 11-wk study to investigate breed type differences and effects of Cu deficiency on concentrations of trace elements in plasma and edible tissues as well as mRNA expression of Cu-related genes. Heifers were fed a grass diet (6.4 +/- 0.2 [SEM] mg Cu/kg DM) supplemented with 1 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 1 to 4 and 2 mg Mo/kg DM in wk 5 to 11, with blood samples collected every 2 wk and tissue collection postmortem. Plasma, liver, kidney, and semitendinosus and cardiac muscle were analyzed for Zn, Cu, Fe, Se, Mo, Co, and Mn. Expression of mRNA Cu-related genes was measured in aorta (lysyl oxidase [LOX]), liver (Cu transporting beta-polypeptide [Atp7b], Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase [CCS], cytochrome c oxidase assembly homolog 17 [Cox17], Cu transporter 1 homolog [Ctr1], and superoxide dismutase 1 [Sod1]), and duodenum (diamine oxidase [DAO] and metallo-thionein-1A [Mt1a]) as well as the Se-related glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1). Zebu cattle maintained initial plasma Cu concentrations just below the threshold value for deficiency, whereas crossbred cattle gradually became severely Cu deficient over time (P {\textlangle} 0.001). In contrast, plasma Zn and Co were greater in zebu cattle at the onset of the trial but became similar to crossbred cattle towards the end of the trial (P {\textlangle} 0.001). Liver Cu (P = 0.002) and Fe (P {\textlangle}= 0.001), kidney Se (P {\textlangle} 0.001), and kidney and cardiac muscle Co (P {\textlangle}= 0.001) concentrations were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. Increased hepatic mRNA expression of the Cu regulatory genes Atp7b, Ctr1 (P = 0.02), CCS (P = 0.03), and Cox17 (P = 0.009) and Cu-related Sod1 (P = 0.001) as well as the Se-related Gpx1 (P {\textlangle}= 0.001) were greater in zebu than in crossbred cattle. However, duodenal mRNA expression of DAO (P = 0.8) and Mt1a (P = 0.2) and aortic expression of LOX (P = 0.8) were not different. Both the differences in Cu status indices (plasma and liver concentrations) and hepatic mRNA expression of Cu regulatory genes point to the possibility of a more efficient use of dietary Cu in B. indicus as compared to B. taurus x B. indicus cattle resulting in greater sensitivity to Cu deficiency in B. taurus crossbred cattle.},
  author       = {Dermauw, Veronique and De Cuyper, Annelies and Duchateau, Luc and Waseyehon, Assen and Dierenfeld, Ellen and Clauss, Marcus and Peters, Iain R and Du Laing, Gijs and Janssens, Geert},
  issn         = {0021-8812},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {ETHIOPIA,AFRICA,ANGUS,EXCRETION,RUMINANTS,MOLYBDENUM,SHEEP,BREED,RIFT-VALLEY,deficiency,trace element,zebu,GLUTATHIONE-PEROXIDASE,copper,cattle,Bos indicus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {3007--3017},
  title        = {A disparate trace element metabolism in zebu (Bos indicus) and crossbred (Bos indicus {\texttimes} Bos taurus) cattle in response to a copper-deficient diet},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2527/jas.2013-6979},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Dermauw, Veronique, Annelies De Cuyper, Luc Duchateau, Assen Waseyehon, Ellen Dierenfeld, Marcus Clauss, Iain R Peters, Gijs Du Laing, and Geert Janssens. 2014. “A Disparate Trace Element Metabolism in Zebu (Bos Indicus) and Crossbred (Bos Indicus × Bos Taurus) Cattle in Response to a Copper-deficient Diet.” Journal of Animal Science 92 (7): 3007–3017.
APA
Dermauw, V., De Cuyper, A., Duchateau, L., Waseyehon, A., Dierenfeld, E., Clauss, M., Peters, I. R., et al. (2014). A disparate trace element metabolism in zebu (Bos indicus) and crossbred (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) cattle in response to a copper-deficient diet. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE, 92(7), 3007–3017.
Vancouver
1.
Dermauw V, De Cuyper A, Duchateau L, Waseyehon A, Dierenfeld E, Clauss M, et al. A disparate trace element metabolism in zebu (Bos indicus) and crossbred (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) cattle in response to a copper-deficient diet. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE. 2014;92(7):3007–17.
MLA
Dermauw, Veronique, Annelies De Cuyper, Luc Duchateau, et al. “A Disparate Trace Element Metabolism in Zebu (Bos Indicus) and Crossbred (Bos Indicus × Bos Taurus) Cattle in Response to a Copper-deficient Diet.” JOURNAL OF ANIMAL SCIENCE 92.7 (2014): 3007–3017. Print.