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Abstract
In this study a novel whole body mouse sized μSPECT image quality (IQ) phantom is introduced which can be used to assess hot contrast on a warm background. The proposed phantom contains five glass capillaries with sub-mm inner diameters (2.0, 1.5, 1.0, 0.8 and 0.6 mm) and a wall thickness ranging from only 0.2 mm for the smallest to 0.4 mm for the largest capillaries. Up until now the IQ phantoms used in μSPECT system performance evaluations only measured hot rods on a cold background. We scanned our μSPECT phantom on a standard U-SPECT-II (MILabs) mounted with respectively the 0.35 and 0.6 mm multipinhole collimators. The 2 mm capillary was filled with air to create a cold region in a warm background. The four smallest capillaries were filled with a 20 MBq/ml 99mTc solution and the background was changed to concentrations of 0, 5 and 10 MBq/ml to result in three different capillary to background ratios (2:1 and 4:1). The total activity in the phantom amounted 97 MBq and was scanned for 20 min and additionaly for 40 min for the 0.35 mm collimator. While visually contrasts were similar in the absence of a background for both collimators, significantly different results were obtained in the presence of a warm background. For the 0.35 mm collimator image noise was too high to recover the contrast in the 4:1 and the 2:1 ratios while the largest capillaries could be recovered for both contrast ratios when using the 0.6 mm collimator. These striking differences between the no background and warm background advocate the need for the phantom here described. The need for a warm background will be even more obvious when evaluating μSPECT systems that employ multiplexing.
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PET

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Chicago
Deleye, Steven, Jeroen Verhaege, Roel Van Holen, Bert Vandeghinste, Stefaan Vandenberghe, Sigrid Stroobants, and Steven Staelens. 2013. “A Whole Body Mouse Sized Mu SPECT Image Quality Phantom.” In 2013 IEEE NUCLEAR SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM AND MEDICAL IMAGING CONFERENCE (NSS/MIC). New York, NY, USA: IEEE.
APA
Deleye, S., Verhaege, J., Van Holen, R., Vandeghinste, B., Vandenberghe, S., Stroobants, S., & Staelens, S. (2013). A whole body mouse sized mu SPECT image quality phantom. 2013 IEEE NUCLEAR SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM AND MEDICAL IMAGING CONFERENCE (NSS/MIC). Presented at the 60th IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium (NSS) / Medical Imaging Conference (MIC) / 20th International Workshop on Room-Temperature Semiconductor X-ray and Gamma-ray Detectors, New York, NY, USA: IEEE.
Vancouver
1.
Deleye S, Verhaege J, Van Holen R, Vandeghinste B, Vandenberghe S, Stroobants S, et al. A whole body mouse sized mu SPECT image quality phantom. 2013 IEEE NUCLEAR SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM AND MEDICAL IMAGING CONFERENCE (NSS/MIC). New York, NY, USA: IEEE; 2013.
MLA
Deleye, Steven, Jeroen Verhaege, Roel Van Holen, et al. “A Whole Body Mouse Sized Mu SPECT Image Quality Phantom.” 2013 IEEE NUCLEAR SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM AND MEDICAL IMAGING CONFERENCE (NSS/MIC). New York, NY, USA: IEEE, 2013. Print.
@inproceedings{4388344,
  abstract     = {In this study a novel whole body mouse sized \ensuremath{\mu}SPECT image quality (IQ) phantom is introduced which can be used to assess hot contrast on a warm background. The proposed phantom contains five glass capillaries with sub-mm inner diameters (2.0, 1.5, 1.0, 0.8 and 0.6 mm) and a wall thickness ranging from only 0.2 mm for the smallest to 0.4 mm for the largest capillaries. Up until now the IQ phantoms used in \ensuremath{\mu}SPECT system performance evaluations only measured hot rods on a cold background. We scanned our \ensuremath{\mu}SPECT phantom on a standard U-SPECT-II (MILabs) mounted with respectively the 0.35 and 0.6 mm multipinhole collimators. The 2 mm capillary was filled with air to create a cold region in a warm background. The four smallest capillaries were filled with a 20 MBq/ml 99mTc solution and the background was changed to concentrations of 0, 5 and 10 MBq/ml to result in three different capillary to background ratios (2:1 and 4:1). The total activity in the phantom amounted 97 MBq and was scanned for 20 min and additionaly for 40 min for the 0.35 mm collimator. While visually contrasts were similar in the absence of a background for both collimators, significantly different results were obtained in the presence of a warm background. For the 0.35 mm collimator image noise was too high to recover the contrast in the 4:1 and the 2:1 ratios while the largest capillaries could be recovered for both contrast ratios when using the 0.6 mm collimator. These striking differences between the no background and warm background advocate the need for the phantom here described. The need for a warm background will be even more obvious when evaluating \ensuremath{\mu}SPECT systems that employ multiplexing.},
  articleno    = {M11-56},
  author       = {Deleye, Steven and Verhaege, Jeroen  and Van Holen, Roel and Vandeghinste, Bert and Vandenberghe, Stefaan and Stroobants, Sigrid and Staelens, Steven},
  booktitle    = {2013 IEEE NUCLEAR SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM AND MEDICAL IMAGING CONFERENCE (NSS/MIC)},
  isbn         = {9781479905348},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Seoul, South Korea},
  pages        = {3},
  publisher    = {IEEE},
  title        = {A whole body mouse sized mu SPECT image quality phantom},
  year         = {2013},
}

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