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Faith and politics: (new) confucianism as civil religion

Bart Dessein (UGent)
(2014) ASIAN STUDIES. 18(1). p.39-64
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Abstract
This article discusses how, in contemporary China, politico-religious narratives that reiterate the country's Confucian tradition serve to create a sense of belonging and sharedness in a community, and provide a way to interpret this community and the contemporary Chinese nation as having a divine mission. As these Chinese foundational myths combine elements of Confucianism with patriotism and nationalism, they can be interpreted as a constitutive element of a "civil religion with Chinese characteristics", and as providing arguments for a "religious" legitimation of the CCP as organization that has to lead the nation on this mission.
Keywords
Civil Religion, New Confucianism, political rhetoric, Confucianism

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Dessein, Bart. “Faith and Politics: (new) Confucianism as Civil Religion.” ASIAN STUDIES 18.1 (2014): 39–64. Print.
APA
Dessein, B. (2014). Faith and politics: (new) confucianism as civil religion. ASIAN STUDIES, 18(1), 39–64.
Chicago author-date
Dessein, Bart. 2014. “Faith and Politics: (new) Confucianism as Civil Religion.” Asian Studies 18 (1): 39–64.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Dessein, Bart. 2014. “Faith and Politics: (new) Confucianism as Civil Religion.” Asian Studies 18 (1): 39–64.
Vancouver
1.
Dessein B. Faith and politics: (new) confucianism as civil religion. ASIAN STUDIES. 2014;18(1):39–64.
IEEE
[1]
B. Dessein, “Faith and politics: (new) confucianism as civil religion,” ASIAN STUDIES, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 39–64, 2014.
@article{4381812,
  abstract     = {This article discusses how, in contemporary China, politico-religious narratives that reiterate the country's Confucian tradition serve to create a sense of belonging and sharedness in a community, and provide a way to interpret this community and the contemporary Chinese nation as having a divine mission. As these Chinese foundational myths combine elements of Confucianism with patriotism and nationalism, they can be interpreted as a constitutive element of a "civil religion with Chinese characteristics", and as providing arguments for a "religious" legitimation of the CCP as organization that has to lead the nation on this mission.},
  author       = {Dessein, Bart},
  issn         = {2350-4226},
  journal      = {ASIAN STUDIES},
  keywords     = {Civil Religion,New Confucianism,political rhetoric,Confucianism},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {39--64},
  title        = {Faith and politics: (new) confucianism as civil religion},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2014},
}