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Editorialising practices, competitive marketablility and James Thomson's 'The seasons'

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Hypertextuality and Paratextuality in James Thomson’s "The Seasons"
Abstract
The lapse of Andrew Millar's copyright for James Thomson's The Seasons in 1765 resulted in an increasing number of new editions of the poem being published in the late eighteenth century. This article compares the print-cultural make-ups of three editions of The Seasons that were issued in the 1790s. An examination of the print-cultural differences between these publishing ventures reveals distinct editorial practices and marketing strategies. In an attempt to increase the attractiveness of their editions with visual and textual paraphernalia, the producers developed their own versions' of The Seasons and, in the process, fashioned new interpretations of Thomson's poem.
Keywords
book history, Print culture, James Thomson, editorial practices, 'The Seasons'

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van De Walle, Kwinten. 2015. “Editorialising Practices, Competitive Marketablility and James Thomson’s ‘The Seasons’.” Journal for Eighteenth-century Studies 38 (2): 257–276.
APA
Van De Walle, K. (2015). Editorialising practices, competitive marketablility and James Thomson’s “The seasons.” JOURNAL FOR EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES, 38(2), 257–276.
Vancouver
1.
Van De Walle K. Editorialising practices, competitive marketablility and James Thomson’s “The seasons.”JOURNAL FOR EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES. Wiley-Blackwell; 2015;38(2):257–76.
MLA
Van De Walle, Kwinten. “Editorialising Practices, Competitive Marketablility and James Thomson’s ‘The Seasons’.” JOURNAL FOR EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES 38.2 (2015): 257–276. Print.
@article{4375157,
  abstract     = {The lapse of Andrew Millar's copyright for James Thomson's The Seasons in 1765 resulted in an increasing number of new editions of the poem being published in the late eighteenth century. This article compares the print-cultural make-ups of three editions of The Seasons that were issued in the 1790s. An examination of the print-cultural differences between these publishing ventures reveals distinct editorial practices and marketing strategies. In an attempt to increase the attractiveness of their editions with visual and textual paraphernalia, the producers developed their own versions' of The Seasons and, in the process, fashioned new interpretations of Thomson's poem.},
  author       = {Van De Walle, Kwinten},
  issn         = {1754-0194},
  journal      = {JOURNAL FOR EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES},
  keywords     = {book history,Print culture,James Thomson,editorial practices,'The Seasons'},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {257--276},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  title        = {Editorialising practices, competitive marketablility and James Thomson's 'The seasons'},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2015},
}

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