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A service life based global warming potential for high-volume fly ash concrete exposed to carbonation

Philip Van den Heede UGent and Nele De Belie UGent (2014) CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS. 55. p.183-193
abstract
To evaluate the global warming potential (GWP) of carbonation exposed high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete, its expected service life should be known. In the early stages of product development, this is done with rudimentary prediction models based on simple colorimetric carbonation testing. More sophisticated methods (e.g. thin section analysis) and prediction models that consider concrete curing and meteorological conditions (cf. Fib Bulletin 34) can be used later on if the former predictions look promising. This paper shows that both rudimentary and advanced prediction models result in significant GWP decrease (-18% to 27%) for HVFA concrete, regardless the underlying carbonation assessment method.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Life cycle assessment, Global warming potential, Service life prediction, Thin section analysis, Accelerated carbonation testing, Steel depassivation, TOOL, Fly ash, POLARIZING MICROSCOPE
journal title
CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS
volume
55
pages
183 - 193
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000333852600022
JCR category
CONSTRUCTION & BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.296 (2014)
JCR rank
7/59 (2014)
JCR quartile
1 (2014)
ISSN
0950-0618
DOI
10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2014.01.033
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4370116
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4370116
date created
2014-04-24 14:53:24
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:04
@article{4370116,
  abstract     = {To evaluate the global warming potential (GWP) of carbonation exposed high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete, its expected service life should be known. In the early stages of product development, this is done with rudimentary prediction models based on simple colorimetric carbonation testing. More sophisticated methods (e.g. thin section analysis) and prediction models that consider concrete curing and meteorological conditions (cf. Fib Bulletin 34) can be used later on if the former predictions look promising. This paper shows that both rudimentary and advanced prediction models result in significant GWP decrease (-18\% to 27\%) for HVFA concrete, regardless the underlying carbonation assessment method.},
  author       = {Van den Heede, Philip and De Belie, Nele},
  issn         = {0950-0618},
  journal      = {CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS},
  keyword      = {Life cycle assessment,Global warming potential,Service life prediction,Thin section analysis,Accelerated carbonation testing,Steel depassivation,TOOL,Fly ash,POLARIZING MICROSCOPE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {183--193},
  title        = {A service life based global warming potential for high-volume fly ash concrete exposed to carbonation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2014.01.033},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Van den Heede, Philip, and Nele De Belie. 2014. “A Service Life Based Global Warming Potential for High-volume Fly Ash Concrete Exposed to Carbonation.” Construction and Building Materials 55: 183–193.
APA
Van den Heede, P., & De Belie, N. (2014). A service life based global warming potential for high-volume fly ash concrete exposed to carbonation. CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS, 55, 183–193.
Vancouver
1.
Van den Heede P, De Belie N. A service life based global warming potential for high-volume fly ash concrete exposed to carbonation. CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS. 2014;55:183–93.
MLA
Van den Heede, Philip, and Nele De Belie. “A Service Life Based Global Warming Potential for High-volume Fly Ash Concrete Exposed to Carbonation.” CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS 55 (2014): 183–193. Print.