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In the name of the father? Christian militantism in Tripura, Northern Uganda, and Ambon

(2007) STUDIES IN CONFLICT & TERRORISM. 30(11). p.963-983
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Abstract
Although armed groups and political violence referring to Islam have attracted increasing attention since the start of the global war against terror, one particular religion can hardly be described as the main source of inspiration of what is commonly referred to as "terrorist acts of violence." Faith-based violence occurs in different parts of the world and its perpetrators adhere to all major world faiths including Christianity. As such, this article treats three cases of non-state armed actors that explain their actions as being motivated by Christian beliefs and aimed at the creation of a new local society that is guided by religion: the National Liberation Front of Tripura, the Lord's Resistance Army, and the Ambonese Christian militias. It analyzes the way by which they instrumentalized religion against respective backgrounds of conflict rooted in social change, the erosion of traditional identities, imbalances of power, and widening communautarian faultlines.

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Citation

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Chicago
Adam, Jeroen, Bruno De Cordier, Kristof Titeca, and Koen Vlassenroot. 2007. “In the Name of the Father? Christian Militantism in Tripura, Northern Uganda, and Ambon.” Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 30 (11): 963–983.
APA
Adam, Jeroen, De Cordier, B., Titeca, K., & Vlassenroot, K. (2007). In the name of the father? Christian militantism in Tripura, Northern Uganda, and Ambon. STUDIES IN CONFLICT & TERRORISM, 30(11), 963–983.
Vancouver
1.
Adam J, De Cordier B, Titeca K, Vlassenroot K. In the name of the father? Christian militantism in Tripura, Northern Uganda, and Ambon. STUDIES IN CONFLICT & TERRORISM. 2007;30(11):963–83.
MLA
Adam, Jeroen, Bruno De Cordier, Kristof Titeca, et al. “In the Name of the Father? Christian Militantism in Tripura, Northern Uganda, and Ambon.” STUDIES IN CONFLICT & TERRORISM 30.11 (2007): 963–983. Print.
@article{436227,
  abstract     = {Although armed groups and political violence referring to Islam have attracted increasing attention since the start of the global war against terror, one particular religion can hardly be described as the main source of inspiration of what is commonly referred to as {\textacutedbl}terrorist acts of violence.{\textacutedbl} Faith-based violence occurs in different parts of the world and its perpetrators adhere to all major world faiths including Christianity. As such, this article treats three cases of non-state armed actors that explain their actions as being motivated by Christian beliefs and aimed at the creation of a new local society that is guided by religion: the National Liberation Front of Tripura, the Lord's Resistance Army, and the Ambonese Christian militias. It analyzes the way by which they instrumentalized religion against respective backgrounds of conflict rooted in social change, the erosion of traditional identities, imbalances of power, and widening communautarian faultlines.},
  author       = {Adam, Jeroen and De Cordier, Bruno and Titeca, Kristof and Vlassenroot, Koen},
  issn         = {1057-610X},
  journal      = {STUDIES IN CONFLICT \& TERRORISM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {963--983},
  title        = {In the name of the father? Christian militantism in Tripura, Northern Uganda, and Ambon},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10576100701611288},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2007},
}

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