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The social interaction potential of metropolitan regions: a time-geographic measurement approach using joint accessibility

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Abstract
We put forward a method for measuring the social interaction potential of a metropolitan region based on the time-geographic concept of joint accessibility. The metric is sensitive to prevailing land use patterns and commuter flows in the metropolitan region, time budgets, and the spatial distribution of joint activity locations. It is calculated via a geocomputation routine in which a representative subset of after-work, spacetime prisms are intersected with each other. Decomposition of the metric gives rise to social potential metrics for each employment and residential zone in the city, for specific commuter flows, and for locations of potential social interaction, such as bars, restaurants, sports fields, and so on. The method is demonstrated via a scenario-based experiment that explores the impact of residential and employment land use patterns and varying levels of commuter flow dispersion. The findings indicate that the metric is adequately responsive to each of the scenario input parameters, as well as pairwise combinations of parameters. Following the experiment, an empirical example using flow data from Salt Lake City, Utah, is presented. Insights on how to introduce more realism in the calculation of the metric for actual metropolitan regions for comparative purposes are then put forward. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of the broader applications of this metric to various topical areas in urban geography including segregation, social capital development, innovation and creativity, and location allocation of facilities and their opening hours.
Keywords
SPACE-TIME, BUILT ENVIRONMENT, urban spatial structure, time-geography, social interaction potential, geocomputation, joint accessibility, TRAVEL, PATTERNS, GENDER, PARTICIPATION, OPPORTUNITIES, SEGREGATION, CONSTRAINTS, NETWORKS

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MLA
Farber, Steven, Tijs Neutens, Harvey J Miller, et al. “The Social Interaction Potential of Metropolitan Regions: a Time-geographic Measurement Approach Using Joint Accessibility.” ANNALS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS 103.3 (2013): 483–504. Print.
APA
Farber, S., Neutens, T., Miller, H. J., & Li, X. (2013). The social interaction potential of metropolitan regions: a time-geographic measurement approach using joint accessibility. ANNALS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS, 103(3), 483–504.
Chicago author-date
Farber, Steven, Tijs Neutens, Harvey J Miller, and Xiao Li. 2013. “The Social Interaction Potential of Metropolitan Regions: a Time-geographic Measurement Approach Using Joint Accessibility.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 103 (3): 483–504.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Farber, Steven, Tijs Neutens, Harvey J Miller, and Xiao Li. 2013. “The Social Interaction Potential of Metropolitan Regions: a Time-geographic Measurement Approach Using Joint Accessibility.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 103 (3): 483–504.
Vancouver
1.
Farber S, Neutens T, Miller HJ, Li X. The social interaction potential of metropolitan regions: a time-geographic measurement approach using joint accessibility. ANNALS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS. 2013;103(3):483–504.
IEEE
[1]
S. Farber, T. Neutens, H. J. Miller, and X. Li, “The social interaction potential of metropolitan regions: a time-geographic measurement approach using joint accessibility,” ANNALS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 483–504, 2013.
@article{4314749,
  abstract     = {We put forward a method for measuring the social interaction potential of a metropolitan region based on the time-geographic concept of joint accessibility. The metric is sensitive to prevailing land use patterns and commuter flows in the metropolitan region, time budgets, and the spatial distribution of joint activity locations. It is calculated via a geocomputation routine in which a representative subset of after-work, spacetime prisms are intersected with each other. Decomposition of the metric gives rise to social potential metrics for each employment and residential zone in the city, for specific commuter flows, and for locations of potential social interaction, such as bars, restaurants, sports fields, and so on. The method is demonstrated via a scenario-based experiment that explores the impact of residential and employment land use patterns and varying levels of commuter flow dispersion. The findings indicate that the metric is adequately responsive to each of the scenario input parameters, as well as pairwise combinations of parameters. Following the experiment, an empirical example using flow data from Salt Lake City, Utah, is presented. Insights on how to introduce more realism in the calculation of the metric for actual metropolitan regions for comparative purposes are then put forward. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of the broader applications of this metric to various topical areas in urban geography including segregation, social capital development, innovation and creativity, and location allocation of facilities and their opening hours.},
  author       = {Farber, Steven and Neutens, Tijs and Miller, Harvey J and Li, Xiao},
  issn         = {0004-5608},
  journal      = {ANNALS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS},
  keywords     = {SPACE-TIME,BUILT ENVIRONMENT,urban spatial structure,time-geography,social interaction potential,geocomputation,joint accessibility,TRAVEL,PATTERNS,GENDER,PARTICIPATION,OPPORTUNITIES,SEGREGATION,CONSTRAINTS,NETWORKS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {483--504},
  title        = {The social interaction potential of metropolitan regions: a time-geographic measurement approach using joint accessibility},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00045608.2012.689238},
  volume       = {103},
  year         = {2013},
}

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