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Present and future of folate biofortification of crop plants

(2014) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY. 65(4). p.895-906
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Abstract
Improving nutritional health is one of the major socio-economic challenges of the 21st century, especially with the continuously growing and ageing world population. Folate deficiency is an important and underestimated problem of micronutrient malnutrition affecting billions of people worldwide. More and more countries are adapting policies to fight folate deficiency, mostly by fortifying foods with folic acid. However, there is growing concern about this practice, calling for alternative or complementary strategies. In addition, fortification programmes are often inaccessible to remote and poor populations where folate deficiency is most prevalent. Enhancing folate content in staple crops by metabolic engineering is a promising, cost-effective strategy to eradicate folate malnutrition worldwide. Over the last decade, major progress has been made in this field. Nevertheless, engineering strategies have thus far been implemented on a handful of plant species only and need to be transferred to highly consumed staple crops to maximally reach target populations. Moreover, successful engineering strategies appear to be species-dependent, hence the need to adapt them in order to biofortify different staple crops with folate.In this paper, the global occurrence of folate deficiency has been mapped and which staple crops could be targeted for folate biofortification and which engineering strategies could be employed have been investigated.
Keywords
metabolic engineering, folic acid, NEURAL-TUBE DEFECTS, RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS, BIOSYNTHESIS GENES, Biofortification, crops, deficiency, folate, fortification, neural tube defects, FOLIC-ACID FORTIFICATION, RISK-FACTOR, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, NUTRITIONAL-VALUE, SHANXI PROVINCE, RICE ENDOSPERM, TOMATO FRUIT

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MLA
Blancquaert, Dieter, Hans De Steur, Xavier Gellynck, et al. “Present and Future of Folate Biofortification of Crop Plants.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY 65.4 (2014): 895–906. Print.
APA
Blancquaert, D., De Steur, H., Gellynck, X., & Van Der Straeten, D. (2014). Present and future of folate biofortification of crop plants. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY, 65(4), 895–906.
Chicago author-date
Blancquaert, Dieter, Hans De Steur, Xavier Gellynck, and Dominique Van Der Straeten. 2014. “Present and Future of Folate Biofortification of Crop Plants.” Journal of Experimental Botany 65 (4): 895–906.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Blancquaert, Dieter, Hans De Steur, Xavier Gellynck, and Dominique Van Der Straeten. 2014. “Present and Future of Folate Biofortification of Crop Plants.” Journal of Experimental Botany 65 (4): 895–906.
Vancouver
1.
Blancquaert D, De Steur H, Gellynck X, Van Der Straeten D. Present and future of folate biofortification of crop plants. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY. 2014;65(4):895–906.
IEEE
[1]
D. Blancquaert, H. De Steur, X. Gellynck, and D. Van Der Straeten, “Present and future of folate biofortification of crop plants,” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY, vol. 65, no. 4, pp. 895–906, 2014.
@article{4306852,
  abstract     = {Improving nutritional health is one of the major socio-economic challenges of the 21st century, especially with the continuously growing and ageing world population. Folate deficiency is an important and underestimated problem of micronutrient malnutrition affecting billions of people worldwide. More and more countries are adapting policies to fight folate deficiency, mostly by fortifying foods with folic acid. However, there is growing concern about this practice, calling for alternative or complementary strategies. In addition, fortification programmes are often inaccessible to remote and poor populations where folate deficiency is most prevalent. Enhancing folate content in staple crops by metabolic engineering is a promising, cost-effective strategy to eradicate folate malnutrition worldwide. Over the last decade, major progress has been made in this field. Nevertheless, engineering strategies have thus far been implemented on a handful of plant species only and need to be transferred to highly consumed staple crops to maximally reach target populations. Moreover, successful engineering strategies appear to be species-dependent, hence the need to adapt them in order to biofortify different staple crops with folate.In this paper, the global occurrence of folate deficiency has been mapped and which staple crops could be targeted for folate biofortification and which engineering strategies could be employed have been investigated.},
  author       = {Blancquaert, Dieter and De Steur, Hans and Gellynck, Xavier and Van Der Straeten, Dominique},
  issn         = {0022-0957},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY},
  keywords     = {metabolic engineering,folic acid,NEURAL-TUBE DEFECTS,RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS,BIOSYNTHESIS GENES,Biofortification,crops,deficiency,folate,fortification,neural tube defects,FOLIC-ACID FORTIFICATION,RISK-FACTOR,ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA,NUTRITIONAL-VALUE,SHANXI PROVINCE,RICE ENDOSPERM,TOMATO FRUIT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {895--906},
  title        = {Present and future of folate biofortification of crop plants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ert483},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2014},
}

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