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Deammonification process start-up after enrichment of anammox microorganisms from reject water in a moving-bed biofilm reactor

(2013) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY. 34(23). p.3107-3113
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Abstract
Deammonification via intermittent aeration in biofilm process for the treatment of sewage sludge digester supernatant (reject water) was started up using two opposite strategies. Two moving-bed biofilm reactors were operated for 2.5 years at 26 (+/- 0.5)degrees C with spiked influent (and hence free ammonia (FA)) addition. In the first start-up strategy, an enrichment of anammox biomass was first established, followed by the development of nitrifying biomass in the system (R-1). In contrast, the second strategy aimed at the enrichment of anammox organisms into a nitrifying biofilm (R-2). The first strategy was most successful, reaching higher maximum total nitrogen (TN) removal rates over a shorter start-up period. For both reactors, increasing FA spiking frequency and increasing effluent concentrations of the anammox intermediate hydrazine correlated to decreasing aerobic nitrate production (nitritation). The bacterial consortium of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the bioreactor was determined via denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. In addition to a shorter start-up with a better TN removal rate, nitrite oxidizing bacteria (Nitrospira) were outcompeted by spiked ammonium feeding from R-1.
Keywords
NITRITATION, BACTERIA, FREE AMMONIA, DISSOLVED-OXYGEN, NITROGEN REMOVAL, reject water, free ammonia spiking, DIB, completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON), anammox enrichment

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Citation

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MLA
Zekker, Ivar, et al. “Deammonification Process Start-up after Enrichment of Anammox Microorganisms from Reject Water in a Moving-Bed Biofilm Reactor.” ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY, vol. 34, no. 23, 2013, pp. 3107–13, doi:10.1080/09593330.2013.803134.
APA
Zekker, I., Rikmann, E., Tenno, T., Kroon, K., Vabamäe, P., Salo, E., … Tenno, T. (2013). Deammonification process start-up after enrichment of anammox microorganisms from reject water in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY, 34(23), 3107–3113. https://doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2013.803134
Chicago author-date
Zekker, Ivar, Ergo Rikmann, Toomas Tenno, Kristel Kroon, Priit Vabamäe, Erik Salo, Liis Loorits, Sergio Cornejo Rubin De Celis, Siegfried Vlaeminck, and Taavo Tenno. 2013. “Deammonification Process Start-up after Enrichment of Anammox Microorganisms from Reject Water in a Moving-Bed Biofilm Reactor.” ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 34 (23): 3107–13. https://doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2013.803134.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Zekker, Ivar, Ergo Rikmann, Toomas Tenno, Kristel Kroon, Priit Vabamäe, Erik Salo, Liis Loorits, Sergio Cornejo Rubin De Celis, Siegfried Vlaeminck, and Taavo Tenno. 2013. “Deammonification Process Start-up after Enrichment of Anammox Microorganisms from Reject Water in a Moving-Bed Biofilm Reactor.” ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 34 (23): 3107–3113. doi:10.1080/09593330.2013.803134.
Vancouver
1.
Zekker I, Rikmann E, Tenno T, Kroon K, Vabamäe P, Salo E, et al. Deammonification process start-up after enrichment of anammox microorganisms from reject water in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY. 2013;34(23):3107–13.
IEEE
[1]
I. Zekker et al., “Deammonification process start-up after enrichment of anammox microorganisms from reject water in a moving-bed biofilm reactor,” ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY, vol. 34, no. 23, pp. 3107–3113, 2013.
@article{4304390,
  abstract     = {{Deammonification via intermittent aeration in biofilm process for the treatment of sewage sludge digester supernatant (reject water) was started up using two opposite strategies. Two moving-bed biofilm reactors were operated for 2.5 years at 26 (+/- 0.5)degrees C with spiked influent (and hence free ammonia (FA)) addition. In the first start-up strategy, an enrichment of anammox biomass was first established, followed by the development of nitrifying biomass in the system (R-1). In contrast, the second strategy aimed at the enrichment of anammox organisms into a nitrifying biofilm (R-2). The first strategy was most successful, reaching higher maximum total nitrogen (TN) removal rates over a shorter start-up period. For both reactors, increasing FA spiking frequency and increasing effluent concentrations of the anammox intermediate hydrazine correlated to decreasing aerobic nitrate production (nitritation). The bacterial consortium of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the bioreactor was determined via denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. In addition to a shorter start-up with a better TN removal rate, nitrite oxidizing bacteria (Nitrospira) were outcompeted by spiked ammonium feeding from R-1.}},
  author       = {{Zekker, Ivar and Rikmann, Ergo and Tenno, Toomas and Kroon, Kristel and Vabamäe, Priit and Salo, Erik and Loorits, Liis and Cornejo Rubin De Celis, Sergio and Vlaeminck, Siegfried and Tenno, Taavo}},
  issn         = {{0959-3330}},
  journal      = {{ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{NITRITATION,BACTERIA,FREE AMMONIA,DISSOLVED-OXYGEN,NITROGEN REMOVAL,reject water,free ammonia spiking,DIB,completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON),anammox enrichment}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{23}},
  pages        = {{3107--3113}},
  title        = {{Deammonification process start-up after enrichment of anammox microorganisms from reject water in a moving-bed biofilm reactor}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2013.803134}},
  volume       = {{34}},
  year         = {{2013}},
}

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