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Modulating plant primary amino acid metabolism as a necrotrophic virulence strategy: the immune-regulatory role of asparagine synthetase in Botrytis cinerea-tomato interaction

Hamed Seifi (UGent) , David De Vleesschauwer (UGent) , Aziz Aziz and Monica Höfte (UGent)
Author
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Abstract
The fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of the “gray mold” disease on a broad range of hosts. As an archetypal necrotroph, B. cinerea has evolved multiple virulence strategies for inducing cell death in its host. Moreover, progress of B. cinerea colonization is commonly associated with induction of senescence in the host tissue, even in non-invaded regions. In a recent study, we showed that abscisic acid deficiency in the sitiens tomato mutant culminates in an anti-senescence defense mechanism which effectively contributes to resistance against B. cinerea infection. Conversely, in susceptible wild-type tomato a strong induction of senescence could be observed following B. cinerea infection. Building upon this earlier work, we here discuss the immune-regulatory role of a key senescence-associated protein, asparagine synthetase. We found that infection of wild-type tomato leads to a strong transcriptional upregulation of asparagine synthetase, followed by a severe depletion of asparagine titers. In contrast, resistant sitiens plants displayed a strong induction of asparagine throughout the course of infection. We hypothesize that rapid activation of asparagine synthetase in susceptible tomato may play a dual role in promoting Botrytis cinerea pathogenesis by providing a rich source of N for the pathogen, on the one hand, and facilitating pathogen-induced host senescence, on the other.
Keywords
asparagine synthetase, Botrytis cinerea, senescence, necrotrophic pathogen, gray mold, amino acid metablism, senescence-associated genes

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Chicago
Seifi, Hamed, David De Vleesschauwer, Aziz Aziz, and Monica Höfte. 2014. “Modulating Plant Primary Amino Acid Metabolism as a Necrotrophic Virulence Strategy: The Immune-regulatory Role of Asparagine Synthetase in Botrytis Cinerea-tomato Interaction.” Plant Signaling & Behavior 9 (1).
APA
Seifi, H., De Vleesschauwer, D., Aziz, A., & Höfte, M. (2014). Modulating plant primary amino acid metabolism as a necrotrophic virulence strategy: the immune-regulatory role of asparagine synthetase in Botrytis cinerea-tomato interaction. PLANT SIGNALING & BEHAVIOR, 9(1).
Vancouver
1.
Seifi H, De Vleesschauwer D, Aziz A, Höfte M. Modulating plant primary amino acid metabolism as a necrotrophic virulence strategy: the immune-regulatory role of asparagine synthetase in Botrytis cinerea-tomato interaction. PLANT SIGNALING & BEHAVIOR. 2014;9(1).
MLA
Seifi, Hamed, David De Vleesschauwer, Aziz Aziz, et al. “Modulating Plant Primary Amino Acid Metabolism as a Necrotrophic Virulence Strategy: The Immune-regulatory Role of Asparagine Synthetase in Botrytis Cinerea-tomato Interaction.” PLANT SIGNALING & BEHAVIOR 9.1 (2014): n. pag. Print.
@article{4292214,
  abstract     = {The fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of the {\textquotedblleft}gray mold{\textquotedblright} disease on a broad range of hosts. As an archetypal necrotroph, B. cinerea has evolved multiple virulence strategies for inducing cell death in its host. Moreover, progress of B. cinerea colonization is commonly associated with induction of senescence in the host tissue, even in non-invaded regions. In a recent study, we showed that abscisic acid deficiency in the sitiens tomato mutant culminates in an anti-senescence defense mechanism which effectively contributes to resistance against B. cinerea infection. Conversely, in susceptible wild-type tomato a strong induction of senescence could be observed following B. cinerea infection. Building upon this earlier work, we here discuss the immune-regulatory role of a key senescence-associated protein, asparagine synthetase. We found that infection of wild-type tomato leads to a strong transcriptional upregulation of asparagine synthetase, followed by a severe depletion of asparagine titers. In contrast, resistant sitiens plants displayed a strong induction of asparagine throughout the course of infection. We hypothesize that rapid activation of asparagine synthetase in susceptible tomato may play a dual role in promoting Botrytis cinerea pathogenesis by providing a rich source of N for the pathogen, on the one hand, and facilitating pathogen-induced host senescence, on the other.},
  articleno    = {e27995},
  author       = {Seifi, Hamed and De Vleesschauwer, David and Aziz, Aziz and H{\"o}fte, Monica},
  issn         = {1559-2316},
  journal      = {PLANT SIGNALING \& BEHAVIOR},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  title        = {Modulating plant primary amino acid metabolism as a necrotrophic virulence strategy: the immune-regulatory role of asparagine synthetase in Botrytis cinerea-tomato interaction},
  url          = {https://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/psb/article/27995/},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2014},
}