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Analytical validation of a human particle-enhanced nephelometric assay for cystatin C measurement in feline serum and urine

Liesbeth Ghys, Evelyne Meyer UGent, Dominique Paepe UGent, Joris Delanghe UGent and Sylvie Daminet UGent (2014) VETERINARY CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 43(2). p.226-234
abstract
Background: In people and dogs, Cystatin C (CysC), a renal glomerular and tubular marker, seems superior to serum creatinine to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A particle-enhanced nephelometric immunoassay is available to measure human CysC, but there are no reports in cats. Objective: The goal of this study was the validation of the human CysC nephelometric assay with feline serum and urine, and to perform a pilot study comparing serum and urine CysC between healthy cats and cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Western blot analysis was used to assess cross-reactivity between the polyclonal rabbit anti-human CysC antibody and feline CysC. Imprecision and linearity were determined for feline serum and urine CysC. Serum and urine CysC were measured in 10 healthy and 10 CKD cats. Results: Cross-reactivity between the polyclonal rabbit anti-human CysC antibody and feline CysC was demonstrated. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation in feline serum and urine were 1.3% and 0.4%, and 12.5%, and 4.1%, respectively. Cats with CKD had a significantly higher serum CysC concentration (1.24 [0.63-2.99] vs 0.79 [0.43-1.05]mg/L; P=.02) and urine CysC/urinary Creatinine (uCr) ratio (565.6 [0-1311] vs < 0.049/uCr mg/mol; P=.005) compared with healthy cats. Conclusions: The human nephelometric assay showed satisfactory validation results for feline CysC. Cats with CKD had a significantly higher sCysC concentration and uCysC/uCr ratio compared with healthy cats. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate CysC as an early marker of renal damage in cats.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DOGS, CATS, METAANALYSIS, RENAL-FAILURE, CREATININE, MARKER, RETINOL-BINDING-PROTEIN, INITIAL EVALUATION, GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE, CYSTEINE PROTEINASE-INHIBITORS, western blot analysis, immunoassay, chronic kidney disease, cat, biomarker
journal title
VETERINARY CLINICAL PATHOLOGY
Vet. Clin. Pathol.
volume
43
issue
2
pages
226 - 234
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000337558500013
ISSN
1939-165X
DOI
10.1111/vcp.12144
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
4285340
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-4285340
date created
2014-02-10 18:11:01
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:06
@article{4285340,
  abstract     = {Background: In people and dogs, Cystatin C (CysC), a renal glomerular and tubular marker, seems superior to serum creatinine to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A particle-enhanced nephelometric immunoassay is available to measure human CysC, but there are no reports in cats.
Objective: The goal of this study was the validation of the human CysC nephelometric assay with feline serum and urine, and to perform a pilot study comparing serum and urine CysC between healthy cats and cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
Methods: Western blot analysis was used to assess cross-reactivity between the polyclonal rabbit anti-human CysC antibody and feline CysC. Imprecision and linearity were determined for feline serum and urine CysC. Serum and urine CysC were measured in 10 healthy and 10 CKD cats.
Results: Cross-reactivity between the polyclonal rabbit anti-human CysC antibody and feline CysC was demonstrated. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation in feline serum and urine were 1.3\% and 0.4\%, and 12.5\%, and 4.1\%, respectively. Cats with CKD had a significantly higher serum CysC concentration (1.24 [0.63-2.99] vs 0.79 [0.43-1.05]mg/L; P=.02) and urine CysC/urinary Creatinine (uCr) ratio (565.6 [0-1311] vs {\textlangle} 0.049/uCr mg/mol; P=.005) compared with healthy cats.
Conclusions: The human nephelometric assay showed satisfactory validation results for feline CysC. Cats with CKD had a significantly higher sCysC concentration and uCysC/uCr ratio compared with healthy cats. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate CysC as an early marker of renal damage in cats.},
  author       = {Ghys, Liesbeth and Meyer, Evelyne and Paepe, Dominique and Delanghe, Joris and Daminet, Sylvie},
  issn         = {1939-165X},
  journal      = {VETERINARY CLINICAL PATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {DOGS,CATS,METAANALYSIS,RENAL-FAILURE,CREATININE,MARKER,RETINOL-BINDING-PROTEIN,INITIAL EVALUATION,GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE,CYSTEINE PROTEINASE-INHIBITORS,western blot analysis,immunoassay,chronic kidney disease,cat,biomarker},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {226--234},
  title        = {Analytical validation of a human particle-enhanced nephelometric assay for cystatin C measurement in feline serum and urine},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vcp.12144},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Ghys, Liesbeth, Evelyne Meyer, Dominique Paepe, Joris Delanghe, and Sylvie Daminet. 2014. “Analytical Validation of a Human Particle-enhanced Nephelometric Assay for Cystatin C Measurement in Feline Serum and Urine.” Veterinary Clinical Pathology 43 (2): 226–234.
APA
Ghys, L., Meyer, E., Paepe, D., Delanghe, J., & Daminet, S. (2014). Analytical validation of a human particle-enhanced nephelometric assay for cystatin C measurement in feline serum and urine. VETERINARY CLINICAL PATHOLOGY, 43(2), 226–234.
Vancouver
1.
Ghys L, Meyer E, Paepe D, Delanghe J, Daminet S. Analytical validation of a human particle-enhanced nephelometric assay for cystatin C measurement in feline serum and urine. VETERINARY CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 2014;43(2):226–34.
MLA
Ghys, Liesbeth, Evelyne Meyer, Dominique Paepe, et al. “Analytical Validation of a Human Particle-enhanced Nephelometric Assay for Cystatin C Measurement in Feline Serum and Urine.” VETERINARY CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 43.2 (2014): 226–234. Print.