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Calculating dry deposition and canopy exchange with the canopy budget model: review of assumptions and application to two deciduous forests

Jeroen Staelens UGent, Daniel Houle, An De Schrijver UGent, Johan Neirynck and Kris Verheyen UGent (2008) WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION. 191(1-4). p.149-169
abstract
The canopy budget model simulates the interaction of major ions within forest canopies based on throughfall and precipitation measurements. The model has been used for estimating dry deposition and canopy exchange fluxes in a wide range of forest ecosystems, but different approaches have been reported. We give an overview of model variations with respect to the time step, type of open-field precipitation data, and tracer ion, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different assumptions on ion exchange within forest canopies. To examine the effect of model assumptions on the calculated fluxes, nine approaches were applied to data from two deciduous forest plots located in regions with contrasting atmospheric deposition, i.e. a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) plot in Belgium and a mixed sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) plot in Quebec. For both forest plots, a semi-annual time step in the model gave similar results as an annual time step. Na+ was found to be more suitable as a tracer ion in the filtering approach than Cl- or SO42- . Using bulk instead of wet-only precipitation underestimated the potentially acidifying deposition. To compute canopy uptake of NH4+ and H+, ion exchange with K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ as well as simultaneous cation and anion leaching should be considered. Different equations to allocate NH4+ vs H+ uptake had most effect on the estimated fluxes of the cation that was less important at a plot. More research is needed on the relative uptake efficiency of H+, NH4+ and NO3- for varying tree species and environmental conditions.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
aboveground uptake, CENTRAL-SOUTH CHINA, atmospheric deposition, canopy budget model, dry deposition, filtering approach, ion exchange, nitrogen retention, throughfall, stemflow, SPRUCE PICEA-ABIES, RESEARCH LWF PLOTS, SOIL SOLUTION CHEMISTRY, SUBTROPICAL RAIN-FOREST, ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION, FAGUS-SYLVATICA, WET DEPOSITION, NITROGEN UPTAKE, NORWAY SPRUCE
journal title
WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION
Water Air Soil Pollut.
volume
191
issue
1-4
pages
149 - 169
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000256011700012
JCR category
WATER RESOURCES
JCR impact factor
1.398 (2008)
JCR rank
16/60 (2008)
JCR quartile
2 (2008)
ISSN
0049-6979
DOI
10.1007/s11270-008-9614-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
428440
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-428440
date created
2008-08-12 11:41:00
date last changed
2010-12-10 14:04:55
@article{428440,
  abstract     = {The canopy budget model simulates the interaction of major ions within forest canopies based on throughfall and precipitation measurements. The model has been used for estimating dry deposition and canopy exchange fluxes in a wide range of forest ecosystems, but different approaches have been reported. We give an overview of model variations with respect to the time step, type of open-field precipitation data, and tracer ion, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different assumptions on ion exchange within forest canopies. To examine the effect of model assumptions on the calculated fluxes, nine approaches were applied to data from two deciduous forest plots located in regions with contrasting atmospheric deposition, i.e. a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) plot in Belgium and a mixed sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) plot in Quebec.
For both forest plots, a semi-annual time step in the model gave similar results as an annual time step. Na+ was found to be more suitable as a tracer ion in the filtering approach than Cl- or SO42- . Using bulk instead of wet-only precipitation underestimated the potentially acidifying deposition. To compute canopy uptake of NH4+ and H+, ion exchange with K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ as well as simultaneous cation and anion leaching should be considered. Different equations to allocate NH4+ vs H+ uptake had most effect on the estimated fluxes of the cation that was less important at a plot. More research is needed on the relative uptake efficiency of H+, NH4+ and NO3- for varying tree species and environmental conditions.},
  author       = {Staelens, Jeroen and Houle, Daniel and De Schrijver, An and Neirynck, Johan and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {0049-6979},
  journal      = {WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION},
  keyword      = {aboveground uptake,CENTRAL-SOUTH CHINA,atmospheric deposition,canopy budget model,dry deposition,filtering approach,ion exchange,nitrogen retention,throughfall,stemflow,SPRUCE PICEA-ABIES,RESEARCH LWF PLOTS,SOIL SOLUTION CHEMISTRY,SUBTROPICAL RAIN-FOREST,ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION,FAGUS-SYLVATICA,WET DEPOSITION,NITROGEN UPTAKE,NORWAY SPRUCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-4},
  pages        = {149--169},
  title        = {Calculating dry deposition and canopy exchange with the canopy budget model: review of assumptions and application to two deciduous forests},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11270-008-9614-2},
  volume       = {191},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Staelens, Jeroen, Daniel Houle, An De Schrijver, Johan Neirynck, and Kris Verheyen. 2008. “Calculating Dry Deposition and Canopy Exchange with the Canopy Budget Model: Review of Assumptions and Application to Two Deciduous Forests.” Water Air and Soil Pollution 191 (1-4): 149–169.
APA
Staelens, Jeroen, Houle, D., De Schrijver, A., Neirynck, J., & Verheyen, K. (2008). Calculating dry deposition and canopy exchange with the canopy budget model: review of assumptions and application to two deciduous forests. WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 191(1-4), 149–169.
Vancouver
1.
Staelens J, Houle D, De Schrijver A, Neirynck J, Verheyen K. Calculating dry deposition and canopy exchange with the canopy budget model: review of assumptions and application to two deciduous forests. WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION. 2008;191(1-4):149–69.
MLA
Staelens, Jeroen, Daniel Houle, An De Schrijver, et al. “Calculating Dry Deposition and Canopy Exchange with the Canopy Budget Model: Review of Assumptions and Application to Two Deciduous Forests.” WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION 191.1-4 (2008): 149–169. Print.