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From intentions to neurons: social and neural consequences of disbelieving in Free Will

Davide Rigoni (UGent) and Marcel Brass (UGent)
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Abstract
The problem of free will is among the most fascinating and disputed questions throughout the history of philosophy and psychology. Traditionally limited to philosophical and theological debate, in the last decades it has become a matter of scientific investigation. The theoretical and methodological advances in neuroscience allowed very complex psychological functions related to free will (conscious intentions, decision-making, and agency) to be investigated. In parallel, neuroscience is gaining momentum in the media, and various scientific findings are claimed to provide evidence that free will is nothing more than an illusion. Why do neuroscientific findings have such a strong impact on our notion of free will? Does it really matter what neuroscience tells us about free will? Here we critically examine studies in experimental philosophy, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience that attempt to provide an empirical answer to these questions. This overview of the literature demonstrates that inducing disbelief in free will has an impact on folk psychology, social behavior and intentional action.
Keywords
Free will, Volition, Intention, WHETHER, RESPONSIBILITY, BRAIN, VOLITION, WILLPOWER, NEUROSCIENCE, ERROR, EGO DEPLETION, WEAKENING BELIEF, SELF-CONTROL, Belief

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MLA
Rigoni, Davide, and Marcel Brass. “From Intentions to Neurons: Social and Neural Consequences of Disbelieving in Free Will.” TOPOI-AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PHILOSOPHY 33.1 (2014): 5–12. Print.
APA
Rigoni, D., & Brass, M. (2014). From intentions to neurons: social and neural consequences of disbelieving in Free Will. TOPOI-AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PHILOSOPHY, 33(1), 5–12.
Chicago author-date
Rigoni, Davide, and Marcel Brass. 2014. “From Intentions to Neurons: Social and Neural Consequences of Disbelieving in Free Will.” Topoi-an International Review of Philosophy 33 (1): 5–12.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Rigoni, Davide, and Marcel Brass. 2014. “From Intentions to Neurons: Social and Neural Consequences of Disbelieving in Free Will.” Topoi-an International Review of Philosophy 33 (1): 5–12.
Vancouver
1.
Rigoni D, Brass M. From intentions to neurons: social and neural consequences of disbelieving in Free Will. TOPOI-AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PHILOSOPHY. 2014;33(1):5–12.
IEEE
[1]
D. Rigoni and M. Brass, “From intentions to neurons: social and neural consequences of disbelieving in Free Will,” TOPOI-AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PHILOSOPHY, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 5–12, 2014.
@article{4268641,
  abstract     = {{The problem of free will is among the most fascinating and disputed questions throughout the history of philosophy and psychology. Traditionally limited to philosophical and theological debate, in the last decades it has become a matter of scientific investigation. The theoretical and methodological advances in neuroscience allowed very complex psychological functions related to free will (conscious intentions, decision-making, and agency) to be investigated. In parallel, neuroscience is gaining momentum in the media, and various scientific findings are claimed to provide evidence that free will is nothing more than an illusion. Why do neuroscientific findings have such a strong impact on our notion of free will? Does it really matter what neuroscience tells us about free will? Here we critically examine studies in experimental philosophy, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience that attempt to provide an empirical answer to these questions. This overview of the literature demonstrates that inducing disbelief in free will has an impact on folk psychology, social behavior and intentional action.}},
  author       = {{Rigoni, Davide and Brass, Marcel}},
  issn         = {{0167-7411}},
  journal      = {{TOPOI-AN INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PHILOSOPHY}},
  keywords     = {{Free will,Volition,Intention,WHETHER,RESPONSIBILITY,BRAIN,VOLITION,WILLPOWER,NEUROSCIENCE,ERROR,EGO DEPLETION,WEAKENING BELIEF,SELF-CONTROL,Belief}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{5--12}},
  title        = {{From intentions to neurons: social and neural consequences of disbelieving in Free Will}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11245-013-9210-y}},
  volume       = {{33}},
  year         = {{2014}},
}

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