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Differences in working conditions and employment arrangements among migrant and non-migrant workers in Europe

(2012) ETHNICITY & HEALTH. 17(6). p.563-577
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Abstract
Objective. To determine migrant workers' exposure to select occupational risks and compare it with that of non-migrant workers in Europe. Design. Based on the European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS-2005, n=29,654 workers, 31 countries) we examined differential prevalence amongst migrant and non-migrant workers' primary paid jobs in terms of employment arrangements (working >10 hours/day, working >5 days/week, on Sundays, without a contract, changes in the work schedule and not free to decide when to take holidays or days off) and working conditions (exposure to hazards including chemical, physical agents, physical load and psychological conditions). For the purpose of this study, a migrant is defined as a person without nationality of the country of residence (n=926). Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) for age, economic sector and education were calculated. Results. Differences in employment arrangements and working conditions were noted by migration status, gender and occupational status. Among non-manual workers, migrant males are more exposed than non-migrant males to negative psychosocial conditions working at a very high speed (aPR 1.23; 95% CI 1.071.42) and shift work (aPR 1.66; 95% CI 1.272.17) and adverse employment arrangements: working on Sundays (aPR 1.91; 95% CI 1.422.55), variable starting/finishing times (aPR 1.17; 95% CI 1.041.32) and changes in work schedule (aPR 1.56; 95% CI 1.301.88). Compared with non-migrant males, male migrant manual workers are the group with a greater number of disparities in terms of exposure to negative working conditions. Female migrant non-manual workers are more exposed to psychosocial conditions working at very high speed (aPR 1.26; 95% CI 1.101.44) and shift work (aPR 1.61; 95% CI 1.292.01) while female manual migrant workers were more likely to report standing or walking (aPR 2.43; 95% CI 1.982.97), not having a contract (aPR 2.94; 95% CI 2.074.10) and not being free to decide days off and holidays (aPR 1.25; 95% CI 1.071.48) than non-migrants. Conclusion. Migrant workers across Europe are more likely to be exposed to certain working and employment arrangements that may place them at higher risk of future health problems.
Keywords
migrant workers, occupational exposure, working conditions, employment arrangements, occupational health, OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS, HEALTH, FOREIGN, POPULATION, IMMIGRANTS, COUNTRIES, DISEASES, INJURY, SPAIN

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MLA
Ronda Pérez, Elena, Fernando G Benavides, Katia Levecque, et al. “Differences in Working Conditions and Employment Arrangements Among Migrant and Non-migrant Workers in Europe.” ETHNICITY & HEALTH 17.6 (2012): 563–577. Print.
APA
Ronda Pérez, E., Benavides, F. G., Levecque, K., Love, J. G., Felt, E., & Van Rossem, R. (2012). Differences in working conditions and employment arrangements among migrant and non-migrant workers in Europe. ETHNICITY & HEALTH, 17(6), 563–577.
Chicago author-date
Ronda Pérez, Elena, Fernando G Benavides, Katia Levecque, John G Love, Emily Felt, and Ronan Van Rossem. 2012. “Differences in Working Conditions and Employment Arrangements Among Migrant and Non-migrant Workers in Europe.” Ethnicity & Health 17 (6): 563–577.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Ronda Pérez, Elena, Fernando G Benavides, Katia Levecque, John G Love, Emily Felt, and Ronan Van Rossem. 2012. “Differences in Working Conditions and Employment Arrangements Among Migrant and Non-migrant Workers in Europe.” Ethnicity & Health 17 (6): 563–577.
Vancouver
1.
Ronda Pérez E, Benavides FG, Levecque K, Love JG, Felt E, Van Rossem R. Differences in working conditions and employment arrangements among migrant and non-migrant workers in Europe. ETHNICITY & HEALTH. 2012;17(6):563–77.
IEEE
[1]
E. Ronda Pérez, F. G. Benavides, K. Levecque, J. G. Love, E. Felt, and R. Van Rossem, “Differences in working conditions and employment arrangements among migrant and non-migrant workers in Europe,” ETHNICITY & HEALTH, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 563–577, 2012.
@article{4256361,
  abstract     = {Objective. To determine migrant workers' exposure to select occupational risks and compare it with that of non-migrant workers in Europe.
Design. Based on the European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS-2005, n=29,654 workers, 31 countries) we examined differential prevalence amongst migrant and non-migrant workers' primary paid jobs in terms of employment arrangements (working >10 hours/day, working >5 days/week, on Sundays, without a contract, changes in the work schedule and not free to decide when to take holidays or days off) and working conditions (exposure to hazards including chemical, physical agents, physical load and psychological conditions). For the purpose of this study, a migrant is defined as a person without nationality of the country of residence (n=926). Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) for age, economic sector and education were calculated.
Results. Differences in employment arrangements and working conditions were noted by migration status, gender and occupational status. Among non-manual workers, migrant males are more exposed than non-migrant males to negative psychosocial conditions working at a very high speed (aPR 1.23; 95% CI 1.071.42) and shift work (aPR 1.66; 95% CI 1.272.17) and adverse employment arrangements: working on Sundays (aPR 1.91; 95% CI 1.422.55), variable starting/finishing times (aPR 1.17; 95% CI 1.041.32) and changes in work schedule (aPR 1.56; 95% CI 1.301.88). Compared with non-migrant males, male migrant manual workers are the group with a greater number of disparities in terms of exposure to negative working conditions. Female migrant non-manual workers are more exposed to psychosocial conditions working at very high speed (aPR 1.26; 95% CI 1.101.44) and shift work (aPR 1.61; 95% CI 1.292.01) while female manual migrant workers were more likely to report standing or walking (aPR 2.43; 95% CI 1.982.97), not having a contract (aPR 2.94; 95% CI 2.074.10) and not being free to decide days off and holidays (aPR 1.25; 95% CI 1.071.48) than non-migrants.
Conclusion. Migrant workers across Europe are more likely to be exposed to certain working and employment arrangements that may place them at higher risk of future health problems.},
  author       = {Ronda Pérez, Elena and Benavides, Fernando G and Levecque, Katia and Love, John G and Felt, Emily and Van Rossem, Ronan},
  issn         = {1355-7858},
  journal      = {ETHNICITY & HEALTH},
  keywords     = {migrant workers,occupational exposure,working conditions,employment arrangements,occupational health,OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS,HEALTH,FOREIGN,POPULATION,IMMIGRANTS,COUNTRIES,DISEASES,INJURY,SPAIN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {563--577},
  title        = {Differences in working conditions and employment arrangements among migrant and non-migrant workers in Europe},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2012.730606},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2012},
}

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