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Biological effects of low-frequency pulsed magnetic fields on the embryonic central nervous system development : a histological and histochemical study

(2011) HISTOLOGY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY. 26(7). p.873-881
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Abstract
Numerous experiments have yielded contradictory results on the harmful action of magnetic fields on embryonic development. Pulsed magnetic fields appear to be able to delay normal development of embryos. In the present study, fertilized Gallus domesticus eggs were exposed during incubation to pulsed magnetic fields (harmonic signals of 10 µT for 1 second with silences of 0.5 seconds) of 50 or 100 Hz frequency. Embryos extracted at 45 h of exposure to fields of 50 Hz or 100 Hz frequency had significantly (p<0.05) fewer somite pairs compared with controls of the same age. At 15 days of incubation, only embryos exposed to a 10 µT- 50 Hz field had a significantly (p<0.05) higher somatic weight. At 21 days of incubation, a significantly lower somatic weight (p<0.01) and development stage (p<0.05) was found in embryos exposed to a 10 µT-100 Hz field than in controls, while a lower development stage (p<0.05) alone was observed in those exposed to a 10 µT-50 Hz field. In addition, animals showed higher expression of the neural marker NSE (neural specific enolase) after 21 days of development as determined by immunohistochemistry, with very low expression of glycosaminoglycans identified by alcyan blue staining. These results suggest that pulsed magnetic fields may be able to hinder normal embryonic development in vivo and to alter normal neural function, at least at the intensities and frequencies analyzed in the present study.
Keywords
Histochemistry, Central nervous system development, Pulsed magnetic fields, Immunohistochemistry, NEURON-SPECIFIC ENOLASE, CHICK-EMBRYO, ELECTROMAGNETIC-FIELDS, HEAD-INJURY, FEMALE RATS, EXPOSURE, HZ, GROWTH, 50-HZ, WEAK

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Chicago
Roda, Olga, Ingrid Garzón, Víctor Sebastián Carriel Araya, Miguel Alaminos, and Indalecio Sánchez-Montesinos. 2011. “Biological Effects of Low-frequency Pulsed Magnetic Fields on the Embryonic Central Nervous System Development : a Histological and Histochemical Study.” Histology and Histopathology 26 (7): 873–881.
APA
Roda, O., Garzón, I., Carriel Araya, V. S., Alaminos, M., & Sánchez-Montesinos, I. (2011). Biological effects of low-frequency pulsed magnetic fields on the embryonic central nervous system development : a histological and histochemical study. HISTOLOGY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY, 26(7), 873–881.
Vancouver
1.
Roda O, Garzón I, Carriel Araya VS, Alaminos M, Sánchez-Montesinos I. Biological effects of low-frequency pulsed magnetic fields on the embryonic central nervous system development : a histological and histochemical study. HISTOLOGY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY. 2011;26(7):873–81.
MLA
Roda, Olga, Ingrid Garzón, Víctor Sebastián Carriel Araya, et al. “Biological Effects of Low-frequency Pulsed Magnetic Fields on the Embryonic Central Nervous System Development : a Histological and Histochemical Study.” HISTOLOGY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY 26.7 (2011): 873–881. Print.
@article{4250864,
  abstract     = {Numerous experiments have yielded contradictory results on the harmful action of magnetic fields on embryonic development. Pulsed magnetic fields appear to be able to delay normal development of embryos. In the present study, fertilized Gallus domesticus eggs were exposed during incubation to pulsed magnetic fields (harmonic signals of 10 {\textmu}T for 1 second with silences of 0.5 seconds) of 50 or 100 Hz frequency.
Embryos extracted at 45 h of exposure to fields of 50 Hz or 100 Hz frequency had significantly (p{\textlangle}0.05) fewer somite pairs compared with controls of the same age. At 15 days of incubation, only embryos exposed to a 10 {\textmu}T- 50 Hz field had a significantly (p{\textlangle}0.05) higher somatic weight. At 21 days of incubation, a significantly lower somatic weight (p{\textlangle}0.01) and development stage (p{\textlangle}0.05) was found in embryos exposed to a 10 {\textmu}T-100 Hz field than in controls, while a lower development stage (p{\textlangle}0.05) alone was observed in those exposed to a 10 {\textmu}T-50 Hz field. In addition, animals showed higher expression of the neural marker NSE (neural specific enolase) after 21 days of development as determined by immunohistochemistry, with very low expression of glycosaminoglycans identified by alcyan blue staining.
These results suggest that pulsed magnetic fields may be able to hinder normal embryonic development in vivo and to alter normal neural function, at least at the intensities and frequencies analyzed in the present study.},
  author       = {Roda, Olga and Garz{\'o}n, Ingrid and Carriel Araya, V{\'i}ctor Sebasti{\'a}n and Alaminos, Miguel and S{\'a}nchez-Montesinos, Indalecio},
  issn         = {0213-3911},
  journal      = {HISTOLOGY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Histochemistry,Central nervous system development,Pulsed magnetic fields,Immunohistochemistry,NEURON-SPECIFIC ENOLASE,CHICK-EMBRYO,ELECTROMAGNETIC-FIELDS,HEAD-INJURY,FEMALE RATS,EXPOSURE,HZ,GROWTH,50-HZ,WEAK},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {873--881},
  title        = {Biological effects of low-frequency pulsed magnetic fields on the embryonic central nervous system development : a histological and histochemical study},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2011},
}

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