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The use of mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social services by divorced people: does informal support matter?

Veerle Buffel (UGent) , Elien Colman (UGent) , Rozemarijn Dereuddre (UGent) and Piet Bracke (UGent)
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Abstract
This study compares the mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social service use of divorced people (re-partnered or single) with that of married people. This paper questions whether the availability of informal support facilitates or substitutes for formal care seeking. Data from the Divorce in Flanders survey of 2009-2010 is used. Logistic regression analyses are performed separately for women (N = 3450) and men (N = 3020). Greater use of mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social services by single divorced men is explained by their higher need for care, while divorced women (especially single divorced), more frequently contact a GP, a psychiatrist, or a psychologist, regardless of their mental health, socio-economic background, and informal support. Women who have support from non-family members are more inclined to use social services and to contact a GP, while support from family members is only positively related to GP consultations. With regard to men, informal support from non-family members positively influences each type of formal care seeking. Our results suggest that non-family members (and only among women, family members as well) can provide help and advice about seeking professional mental health care and social services, but they do not have an influence on psychotropic drug use.
Keywords
gender, CONSEQUENCES, 6 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES, psychotropic drug use, informal support, Mental health care use, divorce, social services use, GENDER-DIFFERENCES, HELP-SEEKING, GENERAL-PRACTICE, DEPRESSION, FAMILY, DISTRESS, MOTHERS, CHILDREN

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Chicago
Buffel, Veerle, Elien Colman, Rozemarijn Dereuddre, and Piet Bracke. 2015. “The Use of Mental Health Care, Psychotropic Drugs and Social Services by Divorced People: Does Informal Support Matter?” European Journal of Social Work 18 (2): 262–283.
APA
Buffel, V., Colman, E., Dereuddre, R., & Bracke, P. (2015). The use of mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social services by divorced people: does informal support matter? EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK, 18(2), 262–283.
Vancouver
1.
Buffel V, Colman E, Dereuddre R, Bracke P. The use of mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social services by divorced people: does informal support matter? EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK. 2015;18(2):262–83.
MLA
Buffel, Veerle, Elien Colman, Rozemarijn Dereuddre, et al. “The Use of Mental Health Care, Psychotropic Drugs and Social Services by Divorced People: Does Informal Support Matter?” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK 18.2 (2015): 262–283. Print.
@article{4249063,
  abstract     = {This study compares the mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social service use of divorced people (re-partnered or single) with that of married people. This paper questions whether the availability of informal support facilitates or substitutes for formal care seeking. Data from the Divorce in Flanders survey of 2009-2010 is used. Logistic regression analyses are performed separately for women (N = 3450) and men (N = 3020). Greater use of mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social services by single divorced men is explained by their higher need for care, while divorced women (especially single divorced), more frequently contact a GP, a psychiatrist, or a psychologist, regardless of their mental health, socio-economic background, and informal support. Women who have support from non-family members are more inclined to use social services and to contact a GP, while support from family members is only positively related to GP consultations. With regard to men, informal support from non-family members positively influences each type of formal care seeking. Our results suggest that non-family members (and only among women, family members as well) can provide help and advice about seeking professional mental health care and social services, but they do not have an influence on psychotropic drug use.},
  author       = {Buffel, Veerle and Colman, Elien and Dereuddre, Rozemarijn and Bracke, Piet},
  issn         = {1369-1457},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK},
  keyword      = {gender,CONSEQUENCES,6 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES,psychotropic drug use,informal support,Mental health care use,divorce,social services use,GENDER-DIFFERENCES,HELP-SEEKING,GENERAL-PRACTICE,DEPRESSION,FAMILY,DISTRESS,MOTHERS,CHILDREN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {262--283},
  title        = {The use of mental health care, psychotropic drugs and social services by divorced people: does informal support matter?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13691457.2014.888050},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2015},
}

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