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How advertising beauty influences children's self-perception and behavior

Iris Vermeir (UGent) and Dieneke Van de Sompel (UGent)
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Abstract
The authors investigate (1) whether the physical attractiveness stereotype applies to children, (2) whether children’s self-perception is influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, (3) whether children’s buying intentions are influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, and (4) whether age, gender, and materialism affect (1), (2), and (3). Results of an experimental research (N=185) confirm the presence of the “what is beautiful is good” stereotype in children. Attractive (versus less attractive) models were also perceived to be less likely to follow the rules. Contrary to expectations from research in adult samples, the presence of an attractive (versus less attractive) model has a positive influence on perceived physical appearance for both boys and girls and also a positive influence on general self-worth for girls. The authors also found that attractive (versus less attractive) models increase attitudes and buying intentions for boys, but not for girls. No effects of age and materialism were found.
Keywords
Self-perception, Gender differences, Physical attractiveness stereotype, Purchase intention

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MLA
Vermeir, Iris, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. “How Advertising Beauty Influences Children’s Self-Perception and Behavior.” Dynamics of Competitive Advantage and Consumer Perception in Social Marketing, edited by Avinash Kapoor and Chinmaya Kulshrestha, Business Science Reference (IGI Global), 2013, pp. 327–47, doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4430-4.ch014.
APA
Vermeir, I., & Van de Sompel, D. (2013). How advertising beauty influences children’s self-perception and behavior. In A. Kapoor & C. Kulshrestha (Eds.), Dynamics of competitive advantage and consumer perception in social marketing (pp. 327–347). Hershey, PA, USA: Business Science Reference (IGI Global). https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-4430-4.ch014
Chicago author-date
Vermeir, Iris, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2013. “How Advertising Beauty Influences Children’s Self-Perception and Behavior.” In Dynamics of Competitive Advantage and Consumer Perception in Social Marketing, edited by Avinash Kapoor and Chinmaya Kulshrestha, 327–47. Hershey, PA, USA: Business Science Reference (IGI Global). https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-4430-4.ch014.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vermeir, Iris, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2013. “How Advertising Beauty Influences Children’s Self-Perception and Behavior.” In Dynamics of Competitive Advantage and Consumer Perception in Social Marketing, ed by. Avinash Kapoor and Chinmaya Kulshrestha, 327–347. Hershey, PA, USA: Business Science Reference (IGI Global). doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4430-4.ch014.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeir I, Van de Sompel D. How advertising beauty influences children’s self-perception and behavior. In: Kapoor A, Kulshrestha C, editors. Dynamics of competitive advantage and consumer perception in social marketing. Hershey, PA, USA: Business Science Reference (IGI Global); 2013. p. 327–47.
IEEE
[1]
I. Vermeir and D. Van de Sompel, “How advertising beauty influences children’s self-perception and behavior,” in Dynamics of competitive advantage and consumer perception in social marketing, A. Kapoor and C. Kulshrestha, Eds. Hershey, PA, USA: Business Science Reference (IGI Global), 2013, pp. 327–347.
@incollection{4242502,
  abstract     = {{The authors investigate (1) whether the physical attractiveness stereotype applies to children, (2) whether children’s self-perception is influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, (3) whether children’s buying intentions are influenced by the attractiveness of an advertising model, and (4) whether age, gender, and materialism affect (1), (2), and (3). Results of an experimental research (N=185) confirm the presence of the “what is beautiful is good” stereotype in children. Attractive (versus less attractive) models were also perceived to be less likely to follow the rules. Contrary to expectations from research in adult samples, the presence of an attractive (versus less attractive) model has a positive influence on perceived physical appearance for both boys and girls and also a positive influence on general self-worth for girls. The authors also found that attractive (versus less attractive) models increase attitudes and buying intentions for boys, but not for girls. No effects of age and materialism were found.}},
  author       = {{Vermeir, Iris and Van de Sompel, Dieneke}},
  booktitle    = {{Dynamics of competitive advantage and consumer perception in social marketing}},
  editor       = {{Kapoor, Avinash and Kulshrestha, Chinmaya}},
  isbn         = {{9781466644304}},
  keywords     = {{Self-perception,Gender differences,Physical attractiveness stereotype,Purchase intention}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{327--347}},
  publisher    = {{Business Science Reference (IGI Global)}},
  series       = {{Research Essentials Collection}},
  title        = {{How advertising beauty influences children's self-perception and behavior}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-4430-4.ch014}},
  year         = {{2013}},
}

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