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Interpreting the Trauermarsch in 'Hades'

(2010) PAPERS ON JOYCE. 16. p.139-150
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Abstract
This paper aims to show how to perceive the music in ‘Hades’ as a Trauermarsch. The reader can sense Paddy Dignam’s funeral cortège as an interdisciplinary experience thanks to a series of devices that become the soundtrack of the episode, such as the same characteristic syncopated rhythm, the alliteration of soundless plosives in combination with laterals, a number of musical allusions, and the ineluctability of silence. As a result, the text is enriched by acoustic features that improve the reader’s level of involvement within this composition of “music of the uncanny” by Joyce, which resembles considerably to Handel’s “Dead March” from Saul.
Keywords
interdisciplinary studies, James Joyce, Literature, rhythm, music

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MLA
Sanz Gallego, Guillermo. “Interpreting the Trauermarsch in ‘Hades’.” PAPERS ON JOYCE 16 (2010): 139–150. Print.
APA
Sanz Gallego, G. (2010). Interpreting the Trauermarsch in “Hades.” PAPERS ON JOYCE, 16, 139–150.
Chicago author-date
Sanz Gallego, Guillermo. 2010. “Interpreting the Trauermarsch in ‘Hades’.” Papers on Joyce 16: 139–150.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Sanz Gallego, Guillermo. 2010. “Interpreting the Trauermarsch in ‘Hades’.” Papers on Joyce 16: 139–150.
Vancouver
1.
Sanz Gallego G. Interpreting the Trauermarsch in “Hades.”PAPERS ON JOYCE. 2010;16:139–50.
IEEE
[1]
G. Sanz Gallego, “Interpreting the Trauermarsch in ‘Hades,’” PAPERS ON JOYCE, vol. 16, pp. 139–150, 2010.
@article{4242351,
  abstract     = {This paper aims to show how to perceive the music in ‘Hades’ as a Trauermarsch. The reader can sense Paddy Dignam’s funeral cortège as an interdisciplinary experience thanks to a series of devices that become the soundtrack of the episode, such as the same characteristic syncopated rhythm, the alliteration of soundless plosives in combination with laterals, a number of musical allusions, and the ineluctability of silence. As a result, the text is enriched by acoustic features that improve the reader’s level of involvement within this composition of “music of the uncanny” by Joyce, which resembles considerably to Handel’s “Dead March” from Saul.},
  author       = {Sanz Gallego, Guillermo},
  issn         = {1135-0504},
  journal      = {PAPERS ON JOYCE},
  keywords     = {interdisciplinary studies,James Joyce,Literature,rhythm,music},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {139--150},
  title        = {Interpreting the Trauermarsch in 'Hades'},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2010},
}